ot a bit, need new tire suggestions

I need new tires on a 2007 half ton (2 wheel drive) Chevy Silverado pickup. The originals are General (Ugh) and have not lasted well. I rotate tires every other oil change and check inflation at least monthly. Still at under 30,000 miles, the tread is badly worn down and I doubt if it would pass inspection.
So I would like suggestions on brands and things to look for.
Next question: Do extra ply tires wear better and what are other advantages and disadvantages?
Is braking distance a factor in brands and extra ply?
All suggestions are appreciated, and thanks for reading.
Bob-tx
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I find that odd. My last General tires lasted over 60,000. But I couldn't tell you how many miles are on my current tires. No doubt you got the cheaper model tires that came with the truck. Since you don't like those, all I can tell you is that I stay away from Michelean (probebly spelled wrong) but always by my tires at Sam's club. By the time you add the tire and installation together, it comes to about 60% of the cost of a regular tire store. Lou
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Ask over at alt.autos.gm
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wrote:

You might check out www.tirerack.com
They have lots of test reports covering wet and dry performance, tread wear, noise, handling, etc., plus user reports. I've found the prices to be competitive, too, even allowing for shipping and mounting fees. But it's a good source of info even if you don't buy there.
Just a satisfied customer.
Paul F.
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wrote:

long life tires tend to have worse traction, I tend to never buy the cheapest anything and go mid price for most stuff. cheap was built to be cheap, high end to appeal to high end must have the best buyers.
mid price appears to serve me well
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

It's hard to go wrong with Michelin unless you are on a limited budget.
I'm surprised you said that the GEneral tires didn't last; my experience with them is that they wear like iron and have similar traction. There is a BIG difference between different tires as to how fast you can brake, and honestly, most Generals aren't that good.
nate
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First off, if you live "up north" get REAL snow tires -- the ones with the "winter mark" of a snow flake and mountain on the side. Run those in the winter and something else in the summer. They are unbelievably better than all-weather.
Second, don't get the MIchelins. I have a set of Artic Alpins a while back and they were horrid.
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Buying tires can be confusing. I worked at an engineering firm that designed tires. Generally, you sacrifice one feature for another. A new tire is better than any brand of an older tire. Decide what kind of driving you do. I'd pick from the top 4 or 5 brands (USA or Canada). I like treads that help prevent hydroplaning and don't need off-road, ice/snow, run-flats.
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A few sites have complete tire ratings of tread life, wet and dry traction, etc etc, find a site and do your own comparisons.
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see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tire
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Bob wrote:

Read half-dozen or so other replies so far...
Generally ( :) ), I'd say the ones w/ a specific brand recommendation or warning against a particular brand (so far, there's one brand w/ both) are the same as the proscriptions/recommendations commonly found here for paint -- by brand alone it's almost impossible to correlate. ALL major manufacturers build tires for a range of price and performance points.
As someone else noted, the OEM tires on light duty trucks are, in general (there it is again :) ), based on initial cost and usually more for ride than either traction or treadwear. 30k from an initial set isn't too bad, probably. As a brand, General makes tires that are quite serviceable as well.
What you need depends on how you use the vehicle. Unless you haul to its rated capacity (doesn't sound like it), you don't need the heavier-ply tires in all likelihood. A LT-rated tire should be used however, rather than a passenger tire of the same physical size for the load rating.
After that, look at the various ratings on the tires for wear, traction, etc., to judge one relative to another. In tires as in many things, there definitely is a correlation to the "you get what you pay for" saw...
--
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wrote:

Don't bother researching the brand. It's pretty meaningless. You need to look at individual models/sizes and how well they work for your vehicle/climate/situation.
I've gotten the most best tires, best prices, best service and best advice from my local Costco.
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Bob wrote:

Before I spent a nickle on rubber, I'd find a shop that really understood alignment and get a four wheel alignment done.
Best tires in the world arent going to last if the mechanicals (caster camber toe in or toe out) are not right.
Yes, I know its a twoi wheel drive ig. Four wheel alignment is a term of art WRT alignment that has nothing to do with how many axles / wheels are diven.
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Poor alignment will wreck a set of tires in 10K or less. Proper alignment *is* very important.
However, have the alignment done (immediately) *after* the new tires are on the vehicle!
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Malcolm Hoar wrote: ...

That would be a very bad alignment, indeed... :)
A competent tire shop should be able to ascertain from the wear pattern whether it is an alignment issue as opposed to, say, under- / over-inflation or simply that the tire is of such design and the driving patterns/road surface/etc. is about the expected lifetime. For an OEM tire, 30k wouldn't be totally unexpected.
I fully agree on the timing of when alignment should be done--after, not before (much easier to measure accurately w/ new tread edges for those who may be wondering is one prime reason)...
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