Oscillating fan repair


Apologies if this is re-post. I seem to be having difficulty transmitting today.
I have an oscillating table fan that recently stopped working. I'll probably just buy an new one, but wondered if anyone here might have any useful suggestions. The fan's performance didn't degrade over time; it was working properly and then suddenly it just wouldn't turn on. I've tested the 4 way switch (Off-1-2-3) and it's working properly. And when the control is switched to any of of the "on" settings, the motor doesn't even make a humming sound and rotation can't be started by giving the fan blades a shove, so I assume the problem is not with the motor starting capacitor. The shaft can be turned freely by hand and there don't seem to be any broken or disconnected wires. Are there any other "usual causes" of this type problem that should be investigated before I throw this thing away? Thanks for your replies!
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PE wrote:

Is it plugged in? If so, is there power to the plug?
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"I booted and my monitor won't come on."
"Jeff, did you turn the monitor on?"
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"Reboot!, now".
"Nope, that don't work."
"I'll be there in a few minutes."
Turned the monitor on and I had a nice day, afterwards.
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On 8/22/2010 2:06 PM PE spake thus:

On these types of fans, with really small fractional-horsepower motors, there's no starting capacitor.

Since no humming sound, it must be a broken wire/connection somewhere. I'd just start taking it apart and looking at wiring. If you can get the motor apart (sometimes they're made in two halves that mate), you may be able to find an open connection somewhere. Probably worth 10-20 minutes of rooting around in it.
Could even be a broken connection inside the plug, or in the cord somewhere. Check it for obvious breaks or other damage.
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On Sun, 22 Aug 2010 16:32:03 -0700, David Nebenzahl

Unplug the fan and turn the switch on. You should get continuity from one prong to the other. If you don't, you can be sure you have a broken connection. If you do get continuity, then it is most likely the outlet.
You do have a voltage tester. Right? Plug in a lamp.
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A lot of these have a soldered in thermal fuse in the motor. It blows if the fan is stalled for too long or has a bind in the bearings. When it blows you usually toss the fan but they do sell a few values at Radio Shack. They are rated in temperature C (the marking on the barrel)
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