one-wire pole transformers

Page 4 of 4  
On 2/29/2012 7:42 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

To return to where this started_
Dufas said "Another common high voltage power feed in the U.S. is 13,800 volts." I really think everyone knew exactly what he was talking about.
If he had said "Another common medium voltage power feed in the U.S. is 13,800 volts" what he said would have been less intelligible.
gfretwell might have replied something like "You might be interested that the utility guys call it medium voltage."
Instead Evan said 'it is medium voltage for people who know what they are talking about.' People who know what they are talking about apparently doesn't include Dufas. Also 'it is only be considered "high voltage" to someone who is only familiar with "low voltages" less than 600 volts" '. (Which Dufas has demonstrated is untrue - electricians also work on "high voltage" 13.8kV systems.)
It is the classical Evan - pompous and condescending - that particularly annoys me.
--
bud--

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/1/2012 12:00 PM, bud-- wrote:

Well shucks, Evan doesn't bother me but what we both wrote was true depending on the context. To me, any voltage of a level that would allow it to jump from a conductor to me any distance through air of a normal humidity is darn well "high voltage". An electrical engineer I knew was killed some years ago when a door locking rod in the cabinet door of a piece of 4,160 volt switch gear slipped out of its retainer and fell into the energized buss as he opened the door, it was quite an explosion that took out a wonderful guy and family man. Very high current and high voltage power is nothing to relax and be comfortable around. Too many good people have made that horrible mistake. o_O
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/29/2012 10:39 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

As I wrote, it depends on who is using the term.
For this newsgroup I don't see correcting Dufas being at all useful, particularly when Evan said Dufas did not know what he was "talking about". Perhaps in an electrical engineering forum....
Somewhere like here I would likely use transmission, distribution, and utilization voltage.
--
bud--

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/24/2012 9:45 AM, Evan wrote:

Totally irrelevant to what dennis asked.
In the urban area here the primary return is by the continuous secondary neutral, which attaches to the primary neutral at the feed point. It is multi-grounded, but the wire is lower resistance than the earth (or at least lower resistance than the earth connection). In rural areas I don't remember anywhere there wasn't another wire on the pole in addition to 1 or 3 distribution wires. Transmission wires don't necessarily have a neutral because it can be created at a substation. There may be solely earth return somewhere in the state, but I don't remember seeing it.
--
bud--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"Continuous Secondary Neutral" if by that you mean it is connected to all service points fed by each separate transformer, then ok, if you mean that all the secondary neutrals on all transformers are connected in common, not where I am from...
You can clearly see on some streets which used to be fed from only one transformer that now have more than one now feeding the houses, that the original wires have been cut, drawn back and taped up to break the circuit in the areas fed by the new transformers...
As far as what I said not applying to the OP's question, it does, the transformer breaking down power from intermediate distribution voltages down to residential 240 volt service is providing single phase power with a center tapped secondary winding providing the neutral which allows for 120 volt loads...
~~ Evan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 21:34:31 -0800 (PST), Evan

The distribution FPL uses is wye primary feeding the regular center tapped secondary. The neutral is common with all of the transformers and the neutrals on the secondary which is a bus feeding several houses.
This is a place where they cut into the bus and set an additional transformer. Notice the insulators in the secondary bus to the down stream houses. The neutral was not cut
http://gfretwell.com/electrical/start_of_bus.jpg
http://gfretwell.com/electrical/transformer.jpg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 29 Feb 2012 01:48:41 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Here is a better picture of the insulators, notice the neutral on top is unbroken
http://gfretwell.com/electrical/insulator.jpg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 24 Feb 2012 07:14:56 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

There is no grounded conductor on the pole? That is unusual but not unheard of. They may be using earth return. That is the formula for "stray voltage" problems.
Get some pictures
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was looking outside one snowy day, and I saw a tree branch fall in my front yard with the end on fire. The branch had hit the single top wire connecting ground.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.