Newbie at This Stuff

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says...

I haven't seen these myself, but here are some reviews (you can get these cheap on Half.com):
http://rebeccasreads.com/reviews/07hmgar/07susj22.html
http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0743439643/ref%3Dpd%5Fsim%5Fdp % 5F2/701-2947586-8783541
http://www.bestbookdeal.com/book/157145537X
Jeannie
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Another thought, Linda....
K > > i would suggest a good cordless (rechargeable) drill, K > If you only want one dirll, let it be corded. K > The cordless drill is K > 1. more expensive. K > 2. bulkier, heavier. K > 3. less powerful. K > 4. Battery will die in a few years, the replacement will cost more K > than the drill then. K > 5. The battery is not charged when you want to use it. K > 6. The battery will run of juice just 2 drills away from finishing K > your job.
Having 'played' with drills for a few decades I agree with Karen. While cordless drills are handy a good variable speed plug-in drill would be the better choice.
In the 2-worth dep't, I would advise against those "cordless screwdrivers". Much less power than a cordless drill, plus generally uncomfortable. Those with straight-line construction are hard on the wrist; right-angle/pistol grip designs are better (IMO) but still lack power.
Another thing comes to mind. In a previous message I suggested adrill bit set. An even better upgrade would be to get one which also has screwdriver bits, or to get a second set of screwdriver bits. (Also get the regular hand screwdrivers - drills don't do everything!) There are other slot configurations besides straight and Phillips (cross). Hex head have a six-sided outside (instead of rounded) - in many instances easier to screw in and out, by hand or motorized. Also Robertson (think it's called that) which has a square indentation instead of the slot (or cross). Torx is another option but I don't use those much.
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
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I agree, but would add that corded drills can be quite powerful and, consequently, dangerous. A cordless screwdriver can be had for $6. and gets the job done without excessive power and torque. I'd hate to use my corded drill to drive screws - it'd likely slice my finger instantly. A $6. ryobi cordless from Home Depot and a set of bits for $1. from the dollar store works wonders and is very convenient.
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hand
advice?
basics...nothing
you
Get a moderately priced cordless drill. Virtually everyone has these nowadays and they can come in very handy as an electric screwdriver too (it should come with a couple screwdriver bits - if not, buy a couple.) Buy a small drill bit kit - one with about a dozen drill bits in it. Most things that you install yourself will tell you which size drill bit to use. So, make sure you get a kit where the sizes are clearly marked (e.g. 1/4"). Cement usually takes a special drill bit, so you might want to pick up a few of those too.
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with
folks,
in
she?
even
bits
avoid
hand
advice?
basics...nothing
you
Over the years I've found having many different tools is the key to getting things done. You never know what problems you might run into. Quality is nice, but quantity counts more in my opinion. Get as many different cheap tools as you can find over time. I'm talking as a do-it-yourselfer here, not as a pro. Pro tools are a whole different game.
Cheap drill bits will cut through concrete generally. So, you might burn one from time to time. If you're not a pro, who cares. You don't need something to last through hundreds of jobs. You just need to hang a few pictures.
A corded drill is a good idea too. If you buy a cordless you'll likely lose the batteries before you've used it much. Buy a corded one and you can use it occasionally for a lifetime.
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I agree generally. One exception I would make is for screwdrivers. You need metal that will hold up when you bear down, and the 10 fo $1. ones just fall apart with ordinary use. But most other tools don't usually give up much quality for price. It is nice to have things like a large, heavy pipe wrench. But they can be picked up at auctions or garage sales. Many items, like a torque wrench, can cost $4. or $40. Buy the $4. one if, like me, you need it maybe once every 5 years. But if you use it alot or the exact pressure is critical, buy the good one.
It's all about trade-offs. But most cheap tools today get the job done. Where they tend to fail is in heavy use and precision.
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Forget about being embarassed! I'm new to this stuff too, but I noticed that no-one suggested that you buy a level so when you hang the drape hardware, your drapes will be straight. This is very important!
I drive everyone insane with my insistance on girlifying stuff up. I found a swell plastic case filled with a collection of drill & screw bits which I refer to as Malibu Barbie's dream drill accessory kit. I actually prefer a corded drill because I have small, arthritic hands and the cordless drills are too heavy & hurt. Buying several good power tool rated extension cords has been great. We have a couple of drills and we have bought a couple from Sears that are reconditioned and work really well.
Don't worry when people look at you like you have three heads. That Reader's Digest home repair book that someone else mentioned is wonderful and has pictures. I am very methodical in my approach to things and I think about what i want to do very carefully & make drawings, etc. It doesn't mean I won't go to the hardware store twenty times.
I now have a variety of home repair skills. Yesterday, I replaced a faucet on a bathroom sink that a plumber tried to scare me out of trying. He was a bad plumber who wanted to take advantage of me (wanted me to buy the faucet from him & said that basically, we'd have to buy a new sink). Unlike my much handier husband, I find that slow & steady makes for a good job. Lay everything out in order, read the directions & understand that you can call in a pro if you mess up too badly. But you probably will do a great job!
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Be sure your extension cords are husky enough. Too small and they lose voltage then there's a risk of burning up the motor. I'm buying only #14 extensions.
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Yup; this is *very* important.
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wrote:

Yes, but! I installed a 4' length of wood doweling on an elderly relative's wall for displaying a quilt--used a level as you suggest. It looked AWful. Reason? Because the ceiling in that room was not level (it was a low ceiling and sloped slightly for drainage of the roof above).
Had to remount the dowel so that it "looked right," even though it was far from level!
For reasons like this it's often better to just "eyeball" levelness! Hanging pictures, for instance.

As long as you're girlifying YOUR bathroom and not mine, go right ahead, kiddo! :-)

Ha! Me too. I make drawing after drawing of what I want to build or modify. And if my sketch doesn't feel just right, I set it aside and don't even try to come back to it for several hours. And after a bit, lo and behold, new ideas come!

Lots of good advice! Atta Grrl, Montana! [But where was "handier" hubby when that plumber was trying to (ahem) 'take advantage' of you?!]
--John W. Wells
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No, the "girlifying" part comes from calling the plastic box of bits "Malibu Barbie's dream drill accessory kit". I did put some nail polish on my chainsaw because it was too blah looking...
snip

He sat right next to me and listened to what the guy said. He didn't want that guy to work in our house and didn't like the scare tactics. DH has a good amount of bad plumbing experiences behind him and is not interested in any plumbing projects. That's fine with me; he has many skills that I don't have (yet). I have replaced all the guts of a toilet, replumbed the kitchen sink & installed a new disposer and now there's the new faucet (and I had to replace the shut-off valves, too...)
DH went on at length about how much the plumber bothered him, gave me heaps of praise, made some bragging calls to his friends & made Eggplant Parmesana for dinner.
Between this newsgroup & HGTV, I have had a great education!
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Oops; forgot to respond to this. Yes, most homes are not level (walls are not square or flat) and things do have to be eyeballed, but I like to see where level is, first. If nothing else, I want to make sure that the parts of the hardware are level with each other, if not "level" level.
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snip

I often use a line level for the small stuff. Very inexpensive.
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If any of those droids gives you any crap, give him a withering look that says, "Don't give me any shit, numbnuts. Remember I can cut off your penis in your sleep."
Go to any public library, and ask the librarian, "Tools?" ; (love the little SEG ^ Thanks!)
Have Fun! Rich
Denise wrote:

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