New Toilet install - no shut off valve in supply line

I've got a 67 year old toilet that is cracked and also has started leaking a bit down onto the pipes in the basement. I've never put in a new toilet, but from everything i read, it doesn't sound like brain surgery. One obstacle that makes me want to get a pro to do it is that the water supply line to my toilet goes straight into the wall. It doesn't have a shut off value that I can easily get to. Has anyone seen one like this? Will I just need to shut off the water to the entire house before starting work on it?
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On Jul 23, 1:56 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It's suppose to have it's own shut off valve, but just turn off whatever is feeding that line. If it means shutting off the main valve, then fine.
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Yes.......and when the supply is shut off----first install a shut off valve for the toilet supply line. This will allow you to restore water to the rest of the house while you work on the toilet.
Smarty

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And the shutoff does not have to be by the toilet. It can be any convenient place in the line leading to the toilet.
Harry K
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Smarty wrote:

And be sure to use the newer type quarter turn valve for more reliable service. HTH
Joe
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It's not brain surgery but first and only time I tried to install a toilet, I over torqued bolt and cracked and ruined toilet. Lots of people I talked to afterwards have done this. You could probably have a plumber install for about $300 which would include needed shut off valve and toilet. Frank
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Heh, I just did this with my second toilet install. Except I didn't crack the toilet, I cracked the plastic flange that it gets bolted to.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Fixing the crack might be easier...
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The leak isn't coming from the crack. I think the wax ring or flange might be bad. The crack is more of an aesthetic thing on the bowl and near the base. The toilet has a mfg. date of 1940 on it...i think its time has come...
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If the house/installation the toilet is in is the same age as it is itself, you may find some other "issues" when you take it up.
Things like cast drain and flange that have at least a chance of being rusted out and who knows how corroded up stuff will be.
Not to say it can't be done by a reasonably able DIY'er, but as a first project it just may come w/ challenges.
What is the feed line? If original and galvanized, it's good chance it's on its last few years of life, as well, so need to be prepared there, as well.
As for the cutoff valve, normally one has a straight supply line thru the wall and then uses a 90-deg valve w/ a compression fitting to supply the stool tank. It only takes a short section of pipe to install one of these, but you do need either a threaded end if galvanized or enough of a stub to sweat a fitting onto if copper.
If they did something like run a small diameter flex copper or worse of a homebrew, then you'll need/want to work backwards to clean that up, too.
If it might include any of these complications and if the supply lines to the bathroom were accessible, you might consider installing another cutoff there to isolate the room before you delve into "who knows what?" territory. That would especially attractive if have more than one bath so it's only a little inconvenience if this one is out of service a couple of days (as opposed to a major problem/disaster).
--


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Reality.
Pay attention to the reply this references. They are all real possibilities. Or it could go easily. But think probability with a 67 year old install. That in combo with this being your first replacement might be worth having it done. If you don't have a 2nd crapper you're a gambling man. Plumber has everything in the truck. Don't forget to add to cost of DIY gas $ for 4 trips to HD, time returning stuff, possible HD wing nut that gives you bad info, blah blah.
One thing that can be very helpful for DIYer going to home center for solutions is a digital camera. Take a pic of what you are trying to solve, print it in gray scale and bring it with you. Pic worth 1k words and if you get a good guy in the plumbing dept, they might foresee a problem or alternative solution.
Just my .02 (actually worth less than that). Al...
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Ah, maybe a simple wax ring replacement. Problem is, if you're determined to have a new toilet, be prepared for sticker shock and possibly non-satisfactory operation.
In days of old, When knights were bold, Before toilets were invented, They dumped their load, Beside the road, And went their way contented.
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HeyBub wrote:

was one I broke - it was the old toilet that plumber removed to fix leak. I have plumbers do now what I used to do when younger because neck problems etc have slowed me down. I've replaced shutoff valves, flush mechanisms, rusted bolts and seal between tank and basin, etc. Something always going wrong so when next toilet malfunctioned, got a new one. Price for toilet and plumber less than $300. I did pay $400 for a nicer Toto. In spite of what others say about new toilets over old, my new ones flush better than the old ones. In addition there is the bonus of much less water going to septic drain field. Frank
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I feel like a wuss for not taking it on myself. But, after researching it a bit and reading some of the posts on here, I think it might be more prudent to let a plumber handle this one. Especially since I'm trying to get this place on the market in the next month. I don't need any more obstacles than I already have.
Thanks for all your opinions.
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