New Electric Dryer -- worth it?

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Awl --
The list of reasons to replace a traditional top loader washing machine with a front loader is about an arm-length long -- it's rare that such purchase decisions are win-win-win-win, with virtually no tradeoffs.
What can be said about newer dryers vs. older dryers? It seems to me that there is not such a big diff between new and old, as, well, heat is heat, air is air, and cfm's are cfm's.
Any opinions? I'm telling the wife to just let the old 20+ year old Kenmore dryer run 'til it drops. Which is what we did with their top loader washer, which I regret, now that I know how much front loaders save.
Also, the washer/dryer price differential seems to be a lot smaller than it used to be. Iow, dryers aren't cheap, despite their ostensible simplicity.
--
EA



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Don't regret the toploader until your wife gives a pass to they way the clothes smell and feel coming out of the frontloader.
wrote:

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Good luck with that.
Clean the dryer vent to be sure it is in top shape and let it rip. Ours is 29 years old and still works. The washer was replaced about 5 years ago and my wife does make occasional mention of replacing the dryer. Aside from not matching the machine next to it, there is no practical reason to replace it. .
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wrote:

The main reason to upgrade would be the moisture sensor. I bought mainly to match the washer, but it turned out to be a good investment, as the drying cycles are significantly shorter, and I'm thinking it has payed for itself in 3 years due to reduced fuel use. Allowing it to stop when the clothes are dry is a lot better than some abstract amount of time.
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as the drying cycles are significantly shorter, and I'm thinking it has payed for itself in 3 years due to reduced fuel use. Allowing it to stop when the clothes are dry is a lot better than some abstract amount of time.
The "old way" for a dryer to determine the moisture in the clothes was to measure the outlet temperature. If the temperature went up that was a sign that the clothes were drying and the heat was cut off. The heat was turned on and off to maintain the outlet temperature at a certain level. If you set the timer for "very dry" then you would end up holding the temperature higher for a longer time. This, indeed, wastes energy.
The "new way" measures the conductivity of the clothes as they brush by some insulated electrodes in the dryer. If the sensor says they are dry then it cuts the heat. Typically, when the heat goes off the moisture in the "center" of the pile of clothes migrates to the rest of the laundry and the moisture sensor once again "sees" moisture. BUT in the "new way" more heat is only applied when there is actual moisture.
The "new way" can save energy. But the smart way to save energy is to have a good idea in the first place of how long the drying cycle should be.
In winter your drying is sending warm/moist air outside. In summer, once the clothes are dry the machine is sending conditioned air outside.
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On Mon, 12 Apr 2010 20:36:38 -0400, "Existential Angst"

I suspect that, much like keeping/fixing an older, slightly more gas-guzzling car with a new one, it's often cheaper to keep using the old washer until it dies -- if you figure a new washer at $500 (yes, front loaders can be had that cheap; we have one that we like just fine) that might last 10 years, that's $4.16 per month. If you do 5 loads per week, saving 20 gallons per load at $5.00/1000 gallons, that's $.50/week or $2.00 a month. So it's cheaper to use the less efficient machine as long as possible, but when buying a new one anyway, getting the more efficient one. Yes, I completely discounted interest, time value of money, water heating costs, the slight dryer savings from the faster washer spin, and more, but the point is that you'd have to calculate all the variables in your area to determine the tradeoff.
But that wasn't your question -- unless your electric dryer has serious problems (or is a fire hazard), it's unlikely that a new one would be much if any more efficient. You'd probably save more by thoroughly cleaning/replacing the vent.
There is often savings to be had buying mismatched/separate washers/dryers. May not be acceptable if visible in the main great room as one of my friends has, but for an enclosed laundry room might be fine. With the front loader with front controls, we have both flat surfaces to pile junk on, so can't see the machines anyway :-)
Josh
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On Mon, 12 Apr 2010 20:36:38 -0400, "Existential Angst"

You didn't do quite enough homework, Angsty!
There is a top loader on the market that has all the advantages of a front loader, (plus a few more) and costs about half as much.
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Ahh, but Salty errs but once again.... "traditional top loader", son. Yer so willing to getcher gloat on, you can't even read my posts correckly.
--
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On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 08:02:09 -0400, "Existential Angst"

Whoosh!
You truly are dumber than dirt. I'll bet your wife tells you that every morning as soon as you wake up.
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I just invested $80 into a 10 year old GE gas dryer. ( solenoid valves, belt, and front drum bearing slides). Probably get at least another 5 years out of it before something needs fixing. Considering a new gas dryer ( at least 7 cu ft capacity) is over $500, I thought it was worth it to fix the old one. While I had everything apart, I vacuumed inside. Also a while ago I changed everything to rigid ductwork instead of the flex stuff. It cuts down on drying time and makes the dryer work more efficiently.
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Your other error is that these high eff top loaders are NOT cheap. And, pray tell, what are their advantages over a front loader?? btw, Howzat 7 year ROI geothermal coming alawng??
--
EA

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On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 08:37:43 -0400, "Existential Angst"

Half the cost of an equivalent front loader, but more than an inferior top loader. I already stated that.

Far less expensive. Doesn't require special (more expensive) soap, yet uses half as much soap as a conventional top loader. Fewer moving parts. Doesn't suffer from mold issues, which have been widely reported as a problem with front loaders. Leaves clothes almost completely dry at the end, after a high speed spin, meaning the dryer, which uses a LOT of energy, doesn't have to run nearly as long. That also shortens the overall time of a wash dry cycle from start to finish, as the dryer is usually the time hog. Uses far less hot water than a conventional top loader.
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Dude, what were you, home schooled???
You stated that these high eff top loaders have advantages over front loaders, yet you cited the advantages they have over traditional top loaders, after I specifically asked you what those advantages over front loaders were.
You can get good front loaders for $500-700, check-rated by CR. Your high effic. top loaders, ergo, go for $250-350?? Try again.
I think you should query your mom about her lifestyle habits whilst you were in utero....
--
EA



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On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 09:06:16 -0400, "Existential Angst"

Their main advantage, AS I STATED is that they have all the advantages at about half the cost of an equivalent front loader. As mentioned, they do have a few advantages over front loaders as well. You must have missed those, too.
There are no $500-700 front loaders that are anywhere near equivalent.
Look out, here comes your "wife" with her strap on, ready to proctologically violate you once again!
RUN!
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On Apr 13, 9:34am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Nothing personal but your posts confused me some as well. You use "they" a whole lot when it would be much cleared if you used "front loader", "high eff top loader", and "top loader" more. Imho, with three different categories pronouns are more confusing. Again, nothing personal.
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On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 07:02:46 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc

Angsty is confused deliberately. I'll take your advice under consideration in the future.
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On Apr 13, 10:25am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

No argument from me on your first point.
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wrote:

No argument from me on your first point. ================================================== You mean you don't recognize SaltyAss's misread of my Q?? And now his refusal to acknowledge his misread? What exactly am I deliberately confused about? You think SaltyAss's response to DerbyDad was appropriate??
Bottom line is, Saltyass has *no idea* of the relevant diffs between an HE toploader and a front loader. For once THAT asshole should supply cites to support his edict-like claims.
--
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On Apr 13, 8:49am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

-
Have you actually priced the HE detergents vs. non-HE? I have found that if you compare the various brands - brand for brand - the price is the same for the same size container and the number of loads listed on both is *exactly the same*. I even called the manufacturer of my FL washer and asked them about the "uses less detergent" claim. How can you be using less if you get the same number of loads from each container of the same size. The CSR stumbled over her words and couldn't come up with a good answer. Granted, the HE detergent supposedly rinses out better which is good since there is less water, but the HE detergent is no more expensive than non-HE, nor do you actually use less.

Can't say...won't disagree

Widely reported, yet also widely disputed. Recall the thread a few months ago where someone posted - in panic prose - all of the dangers regarding mold, smells, etc. related to front-loaders? Every response (including mine) was contradictory to those reports. I've get no mold and my cloths don't smell.

AE asked: "what are their advantages over a *front loader*?
Your answer certainly states the advantage over a traditional top loader as far as dry-time, but I don't see that as an advantage over a front loader. My FL spins at 1100 RPM and I know there are faster machine available. Some fabrics come out almost wearable right from the washer. Are you saying that the top-loaders you are referring to have a *bigger* dry-time advantage over most FL than a FL has over a traditional TL? If not, then it doesn't answer AE's question.

Again, the question was:
"what are their advantages over a *front loader*?
BTW - which TL are you referring to? I looked into a TL that used an octagonal basket and rotated on the horizontal access. The drawback was that the opening into the basket was pretty small. I can shove armloads of towels or comforters into my FL with one push. The TL I was looking at had to have the items fed in (and removed) almost one at time. If I'm not mistaken, Staber and Equator both make horizontal axis top loaders, and they are a great deal more expensive than a typical front loader.
What models/brands are you extolling the virtues of?
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On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 08:18:40 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Asked and answered previously.

Go stand in the dunce corner with Angsty.
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