need help for a small gap between kitchen sink and backplash


I recently replaced the linoleum counter top in my kitchen, as well as the sink. My problem is that there is a quarter inch gap between the top-mounted sink and the backsplash and I need suggestion on what to do with this gap.
The countertop is 26 inches in width from the wall to the front edge. The rolled backsplash is 1.5 inches thick, which leaves about 24.5" of counter space. The sink is 22" front-to back. the countertop overhangs the front of the cabinet by about 1.5".
So the back of the sink is about .25" from the backsplash. Unfortunately, I'm not sure of the best way to finish this. Should I caulk it with cleal caulking (which I think will be hard to clean), just leave the gap, or is there any other solution?
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rlz wrote:

the way this is done is to scribe the countertop to the backsplash, trim the countertop before installation, and get a perfect fit. then screw the countertop down, and add a thin bead of caulk.
another way is to install the countertop scribed to the wall, then the backsplash on top of the counter, and fill with a bead of caulk.
the crack has to be filled. it will look bad to fill it with caulk. i'd take it off and start over.
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I think the OP's problem is the gap between the *sink* and the backsplash (not the countertop and the backsplash).
What's the profile of the gap (square, rounded)? And what are the countertop, sink, and backspash materials?
Are the sink/countertop and countertop/backsplash fully sealed? I'm assuming they are and your concern is basically a cosmetic one. If not, you have a bigger problem :-(
A link to a photo would help but right now, I don't have much in the way of suggestions other than the obvious caulk.
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On Jul 16, 6:00 pm, snipped-for-privacy@malch.com (Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

The linoleum countertop is rolled up to form the backsplash. Unfortunately, I'm not sure how to post a pic here.
Basically the countertop and backsplash is all one piece. | __sink__
The back of the sink is vertical (maybe a slight angle). With the roll of the linoleum, there is a curve along the bottom of the gap
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OK, here are some pics of the sink and gap.
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4082/4800721508_bec0752bda_s.jpg
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4100/4800721522_14a06a9bfa_s.jpg
Hopefully this works.
Robin
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Let's try this again. http://www.flickr.com/photos/52200878@N08/4800721522 / http://www.flickr.com/photos/52200878@N08/4800721508 /
This should be somewhat bigger pics
robin
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There should be as little caulk visible as possible. The seal should be entirely under the rim of the sink. Your counter top is plastic laminate, not linoleum, and it is most likely applied to a chipboard substrate.
Superfluous caulk just makes it harder to clean and gives mold a larger surface to grow on. After removing the old caulk and degreasing/cleaning, I'd use a 100% silicone caulk in whatever color that floats your boat made for kitchens and baths (has a mildecide in the mix), tape off both sides of the gap, caulk, strike off 95% of the excess caulk with a putty knife, remove the tape cleanly (cut into sections as necessary to ease removal), spray a H2O+few-drops-of- liquid-soap solution onto the caulking getting both sides wet, then use a gloved-and-frequently-wiped-off finger to smooth the caulk into its final position. Don't overwork it.
R
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rlz wrote:

Much better :)
What it looks like to me...
1. The counter is post formed laminate, probably over particle board. By "post formed", I mean that the top, backsplash and front edge are all one piece.
2. The sink is rusting which means it is steel, probably with an enamel coating.
3. The laminate appears to have failed back of the sink. No idea why, it should not have. It is possible - can't tell from the photos - that there is no gap, merely an accumulation of rust and crud that makes it appear there is. Have you tried scraping to see?
What I would do...
1. Replace the sink. If it is rusting it will continue to do so. Replace it with stainless steel, porcelain, cast iron with fused porcelain or acrylic.
2. If the top is actually a post formed one and if the laminate has actually failed, I would replace it. Alternatively, after thorough cleaning, it could be caulked as RicodJour explained.
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dadiOH wrote:

It looks like it is rusting along the front as well as rear. Steel sink bedded with silicone? Needs to be pulled up and replaced or - possibly - all the rust cleaned off and rebedded. Use plumber's putty.
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Had a bath sink all cruddy like that. It was one of the cheapo cast iron with porcelain. Removed it. Wire brushed with drill till clean. Brush painted all exposed cast iron with RustOleum Rusty Metal Primer. Fortunately particle board under Formica was not damaged. Cleaned up stained counter with BarkeepsFriend. All worked out real well.
Saw a segment on How They Do It where they were doing maintenance on cruise liners while in port. They use phosphoric acid (unknown concentration) on exposed metal. Converts the rust and leaves a black film/scale which actually becomes a rust retardant. Then of course you look at the active ingrediant in naval jellies and it's...phosphoric acid .
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Thanks, yes, the pictures were much better. Looks like a perfect place to put a generous application of clear silicone caulk.
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I think DadiOH has it right. The OP said there is a gap between the sink and the backsplash, not between the sink and the cutout. The pic appears to be a combination of rust and crud. If the sink and counter were "recently replaced" the OP was either scammed or chose inferior product. There shouldn't be any caulk between the sink and backsplash-- just keep clean with a small brush and cleanser. The caulk should be under the rim of the sink.
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