Need a quick response guys.. New concrete on top of old.

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If it isn't a troll, I see many people who want to take the easy way out, or a shortcut method. They ask the newsgroup readers to get their approval for the shortcut method of doing a job. This way when it fails, they can blame the newsgroup and say ".....they said it would work" or "....this is the way they said to do it", "its their fault not mine".
Sometimes it works out that the newsgroup readers tell a person the correct way to do it and warn him that his way will fail, as happened here.

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Hey Bozo call me a putz , You the Putz .
The right way that will last isnt even near to what i said here say . It would require a daimond drum scorer. Min 800$ machine. You dont want to even clean it with acid first ! Or use a concrete designed for this ! Well its hacks like you that make buying homes a nightmare Concrete looks good but fails 1 yr later. Why ask if you are going to bitch and are to lazy to Google and learn right. Rebar in 2" concrete ! with the right weather your way will be a 4 yr job. Yea have fun Hacko
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Eric Tonks wrote:

You had to wonder?
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listed anyway.
Rough up the concrete before you put the steel. I think rebar is a bit over kill for a 2 inch slab, steel mesh or wire screen would have been my choice.
Have fun
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This is actually a 6x5 slab across the sidewalk. So there are 4-5 inch thick sections 5' x1.5' on each side of the sidewalk. The 2in topcoat is because that's the maximum height I can go above the sidewalk.
So it's a 6x5 slab with an existing 3'x5' 8 inch thick section of sidewalk under the middle. A water tight garbage can storge unit will go over this.
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vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
Serious question. Where was rebar mentioned? I must have missed a message somehow.

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On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 10:01:12 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@address.invalid wrote

I don't know about the glue, but a common "trick" is to dust the slab with some latex modified thinset (HD versabond).
-Bruce
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I would not use a wood glue like Titebond. At best it would do nothing. At worst, it would prevent the concrete from sticking.
When I repaired my concrete patio, I used a special adhesive intended for concrete. It was inexpensive and was sold at the local home center near where they keep concrete patch.
I am a firm believer in using the right tool (or in this case, adhesive) for the job.

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snipped-for-privacy@address.invalid wrote:

glue. Its purpose in life is to add a bit of bonding strength between old concrete and fresh pour. I've used a brand called Pakmix, IIRC.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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It seems that some of the know-it-all types who really don't know much have to act like idiots when you don't take their advice. My question was simple enough. Would throwing in some old Titebond help or hurt. I already knew from experience that plain old white glue is a pretty good bonding agent but I wasn't sure about TiteBond. Well the job is done and I got rid of some 18 month old TiteBond at the same time. Checked this morning and the bond is still holding.<g> Now to build the bear proof unit for the garbage cans.
I would like to thank all the guys who actually responded to my question.
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On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 15:28:56 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@address.invalid

And oddly enough, some of us who have seen how you respond to people who spent time trying to give you advice, won't bother to spend any time answering you in the future. Just because you don't like the answer, doesn't mean you have to call them idiots - keep it up and you'll find yourself talking, but nobody listening.
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Any bonding , glue, welding, concrete, paint, is only as good as the surface prep. Hacks- Know it alls are always making these mistakes.
Bonder on a dirty surface, dumb. But Its your house. Dont ask questions if you dont want the truth.
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On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 13:50:09 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

Surface was pressure washed to be as clean as a whistle. I haven't found anyone who agrees with you. Including a guy down at the cement plant at Rona I talked to today.
I suspect this is the reason you are posting to a news group in the middle of a work day instead of being out there pouring concrete. Hell you can't even afford a computer. So piss off gas bag.
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Pressure washing does little if you started to learn a little ,it wont remove Mold or embedded dirt. Go read a can of floor paint someday or Yinyl cement repair, You will see acid wash mentioned . Learn the way pros restore buildings, Acid washes. Go visit Detrict Chemicals the biggest chemical suplier for stone and concrete restoration.
Agree with me HAAAAAAHAAAAAAHAAAAAA, do you see anyoe here saying im wrong ! So you and your Hack " Pros " just dont know a great job from a good one.
Its also suspicous you just mention powerwashing as a entry, Id say its something you are doing now. Bottom line you are a hack
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On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 15:24:39 -0500, Village Idiot a Netbum snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

I'm a homeowner with a perfectly good slab suitable for my needs.
An unlike you, who probably pays his WebTV subscription out of his wife's welfare check, I actually own a pressure washer. There was no mold, no dirt, just pristine rock and concrete.
But I'm done with you now little child. I have work to do.
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Thats a good boy now go hack it up
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obviously you may have problems with the second pour
what can you do to minimize problems (cracking, shifting, etc.)?
yet you want to use the materials you have on hand, so all you can do is pour the new slab on the old one
if you want to get more materials,
quickrete bonding adhesive is a glue-like substance which may be the source of what you heard,,,don't use your glue, use the quickrete bonding adhesive (milky white in a plastic gallon container), see it here: http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/ConcreteBondingAdhesive.html the instructions say how to prep the area and apply it
also if you can drill into the existing slab and tie some rebar into it and the new pour, that might help adhesion of the new slab to the old slab
using a cement with polymers in it (like quickrete concrete resurfacer, see it at http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/ConcreteResurfacer.html ) would probably be better than just using concrete, though more expensive the instructions say how to prep the area and apply it

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