NEC for dummies

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Any book recomendations for the current electrical code in NJ. I have a lot of electrical work to do and need a reference for residential wiring.
I need something in between the typical picture books sold at the Borgs and a book with 3 phase power tables.
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Limp Arbor wrote:

Have you looked at the NEC Handbook?
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says...

I second the NEC Handbook. Full color drawings illustrating the right and wrong ways to do things. And it explains the situation in common language, not just the technical listing the NEC offers. Expensive but worth it.
--
Dennis


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DT wrote the following:

The McGraw Hill 2008 NEC Handbook is not expensive. (Amazon.com product link shortened)63229808&sr=8-1 or: http://tinyurl.com/yfsdlrt
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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"willshak" wrote in message

(Amazon.com product link shortened)63229808&sr=8-1
The above is not *the* NEC Handbook which is this... http://www.nfpa.org/catalog/product.asp?pidphb08
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Bill wrote the following:

I didn't say it was the 'official' NFPA NEC handbook I said it was the 'McGraw-Hill' 2008 NEC Handbook. But it is a handbook based on the National Electrical Code, never the less. The OP is not an electrician and just wants to do some residential electrical wiring to meet code. Why spend 3x more for a professional electrician's bible?
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

I would say they are both "the NEC Handbook"
For an amateur I think both have problems - They are organized around the NEC. If you are installing a receptacle you need information from multiple code sections (grounding, box fill, branch circuits, receptacles, Romex, ...) An amateur does not know what sections are relevant. - When reading the NEC the text can often refer to other sections which you then have to understand. - The NEC covers the broad range of installations. If you are just working on a house most of it is irrelevant. (There is a residential version of the NEC.)
I would suggest finding a book that aimed at amateurs and is partly oriented around jobs (installing a receptacle) but has the scope that is required to understand the rules (where is AFCI and GFCI protection required). I don't have any titles. You won't become competent overnight.
--
bud--

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bud-- wrote the following:

Well, he did ask if there was an "NEC for Dummies" book :-) Is there one?
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

I borrowed an older version of this book
(Amazon.com product link shortened)63253744&sr=8-1
when I bought my house and I found it helpful. However, make sure you are referencing the correct code against which you will be inspected (likely either 2005 or 2008.) I never bought a more recent copy now that the NEC is online. Might also want to see if your library has a copy.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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wrote:

NFPA also sells a 1&2 family book that is more specific to dwellings. It is a lot less cumbersome for people who are not wiring a commercial installation..
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On Jan 11, 1:17pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Are you referring to this book? http://www.nfpa.org/catalog/product.asp?pid=gdrwire08
The pocket guide is a lot cheaper and may have the info I need. http://www.nfpa.org/catalog/product.asp?pid=PGNECRES08
As I'm typing I am wodering if the library would carry these books...
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Exactly. I don't need a book that tells me the black wire belongs on the gold screw, I grew up in Western PA where everybody knows Black & Gold go together.
I need one that tells me: Which circuits need to be AFCI That an outlet in an unfinished basement can be non-GFCI if it is dedicated to a refrigerator or freezer Garages don't need AFCI If a circuit is strictly lighting does it need AFCI etc.
My last experience with town building inspectors found them less than helpful. They were only willing to pass/fail my plans for structure repair. I read from others on this forum that inspectors can be helpful but not in my town. I get that they expect you to know what you are doing and don't want to spend their time drawing deck plans but they wouldn't even answer straightforward questions about what kind of sill plate hold downs they wanted. I just had to keep resubmitting until I picked the right product.
It leads to people saying "forget it" and doing work without a permit. Then you could end up with an unsafe structure that might even endanger neighbors (bad plumbing or fire hazards).
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Limp Arbor wrote the following:

In my area, there are building inspectors and then there are electrical inspectors. The building inspector is only concerned with the structure and some fire codes (fire rated door to garage, fire rated door on laundry chute between floors, etc.). When the electrics are installed, the electrical inspector makes sure all is in compliance with code and issues a Certificate of Occupancy.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Mon, 11 Jan 2010 10:34:47 -0800 (PST), Limp Arbor
The real answer depends on what version of the code your jurisdiction is on and whether your AHJ has amended it (like deleting the AFCI rules)

In 2008 that is "dwelling unit family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas"

Not in 2008, all exceptions are gone but a burglar alarm.

true
In 2008 " All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets" (serving the locations above) Lighting is an "outlet"

Alas That is true in far too many places.
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[snip]

A freezer is part of my burglar alarm :-)
[snip]
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Limp Arbor wrote:

Here's a list of books that can be had what you call "cheap."
http://cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml10/10104.html
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HeyBub wrote:

Affirmative Action proof readers strike again.
TDD
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Why do you assume a racial component in this? Your bigotry is becoming tiresome.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Uh, why do you assume "affirmative action" referred to has anything to do with race?
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Maybe because ""affirmative action" is defined as having to do with race (and gender).
http://www.google.com/search?&q=define:Affirmative%20action
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