Multiple split duplex outlets question

I am going to be performing a major renovation of my house and for the kitchen, I intend on doing some extreme overkill on the outlets. What I intend on having is 2 split duplex outlets and a single switched outlet for every 4 feet of counter space. That's right, there will be a triple gang box containing 4 unswitched outlets and 1 switched outlet and each outlet will have a separate breaker for a total of 5 circuits.
I know that I can easily obtain 2-pole GFCI breakers and a 1 pole GFCI breaker as well. I also know that the split duplex outlets must be on a 2-pole GFCI breaker in order for the GFCI to work properly with a shared neutral. But I forsee a problem in that a total of 3 breakers (2 double polled and 1 single polled) must be turned off in order to remove all power from each triple gang box. I don't know if the NEC considers this a safety hazard, but I do. Is it possible to link 5 breakers together so that if any of the 5 breakers trip, then all 5 breakers will trip? If so, how would I do that?
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What I did was install more double outlets and boxes. This way each 2 feet of counter space has a 4 slot receptable in my case all unswitched. each dual gang box got its own dedicated breaker on a 20 amp circuit. this minimizes cords draped across counters. its easy to know what breaker tripped too, and each box has its own on site GFCI, so its easy to reset if something trips.
I didnt like the idea of multiple breakers powering a single box....
futher I bought premium 20 amp GFCIs and receptables the back wired kind with screws/ My kitchen now has 5 seperate breakers powering convenience outlets. and seperate breakers for stove, dishwasher, fridge, microwave kitchen light and disposal.
I figured overkill would nean I didnt have to do it again. makes troubleshooting easy too
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What I did was install more double outlets and boxes. This way each 2 feet of counter space has a 4 slot receptable in my case all unswitched. each dual gang box got its own dedicated breaker on a 20 amp circuit. this minimizes cords draped across counters. its easy to know what breaker tripped too, and each box has its own on site GFCI, so its easy to reset if something trips.
I didnt like the idea of multiple breakers powering a single box....
futher I bought premium 20 amp GFCIs and receptables the back wired kind with screws/ My kitchen now has 5 seperate breakers powering convenience outlets. and seperate breakers for stove, dishwasher, fridge, microwave kitchen light and disposal.
I figured overkill would nean I didnt have to do it again. makes troubleshooting easy too
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On Fri, 03 Mar 2006 21:00:02 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@smof.fiawol.org (John Cochran) wrote:

I think it would make more sense to have a duplex box every two feet, With two 3-wire Edison circuts in alternating boxes, and one side of one of them switched.
The would require two 2-pole GFCI breakers, and a switch.
Separating the boxes along the counter means you're less likely to have a nest of wires all headed for the same box, but they'd be close enough together that you could still cluster appliances together without running cords all over the counter.
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On Fri, 03 Mar 2006 21:00:02 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@smof.fiawol.org (John Cochran) wrote:

What are the switched ones for?
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Some kitchen appliances have a cord and to turn them on and off, you have to plug them in and unplug them. My wife would like to have them plugged into a switched outlet and have the switch that controls the outlet immediately above the outlet. (Think popcorn popper and deep fryer).
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John Cochran wrote:

Watch the switch rating - it should be the same rating as the receptacle it switches for your kitchen outlet. If there are more than 2 outlets on a circuit the outlet could be 15A, else 20A. The switch should match. The way I read your description the switched receptacle uses a device like a duplex receptacle except one half is a switch. I wouldn't bet on finding a 15A or 20A rating on the switch.
Hard to imagine how you would need 4 circuits (not including switched one) at one locaton. Distributing the outlets as Goedgn suggested sounds more practical.
bud--
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John Cochran wrote:

I'm not so sure I like the idea of using a wall switch to turn on/off an appliance like a deep fryer. It would seem too easy for someone to turn the switch on, not realizing what it's for, and then have someone try to move the fryer, not realizing it was hot. Or having it turned on accidentally when it had no oil in it, etc.
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If he REALLY wants switched outlets use 3 gang boxes, with the first a switch then a set of duplex receptables perhaps one of which is switched and one not. or use the break away contact and switch just one of the 4 outlets.
I would add a pilot light for each switch as a reminder as to whats on. there should be enough room to fit it by the switch, since lots of switches today are fairly small. ,ake certain swich is rated at 20 amps too
Honestly I think pulling the plug is safer
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There are devices where there is a switch and a single outlet in 1 device. Using a crude ASCII drawing, the desired layout is
+-------+-------+-------+ | | | | | | | ++--+ | <--- A single pole switch controlling a single | O | O | ++--+ | Outlet. | | | | | | | | | | | | | | <--- The switched outlet is immediately below | O | O | O | the switch that controls it. +-------+-------+-------+ ^ ^ | | | | Split Duplex outlets each capable of full draw since each is on a separate breaker.
The wiring for the above beast is
+--------------+ 12/3 Wire | 20 Amp |-- Phase 1 ------- Connected to top brass screw | Double Pole |-- Neutral ------- Connected to silver screw | GFCI breaker |-- Phase 2 ------- Connected to bottom brass screw +--------------+ The tabs between the brass screws is broken off.
The above would be used for each duplex outlet so that a full load may be placed on each outlet without overloading the circuit.
For the single switched outlet, the switch simply controls the single socket immediately below it.
However, the above beast requires 2 double-pole GFCI circuit breakers and a single pole GFCI circuit breaker. What I would like to do is physically tie all three breakers together so that if any of the breakers trip, the entire gang box is de-energized.
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