Multiple Circuit Junction Box

I was just reading some of the older messages regarding having more than one circuit splice in a single junction box.
There is obviously the potential for someone to be injured if they believe only one circuit is involved.
I have a couple of junction boxes where I've got more than a single circuit spliced. I've solved the problem for myself (Poor memory after a few years) by using a self adhesive plastic label holder. The kind found in office supply stores for use on binders.
They're 1" by 3 1/2" and I just list the 2 circuit breakers involved and stick it on the junction box.
These will remain in place forever and a day and I'm not concerned about the next guy to work on that box. Including myself when I've forgotten why I installed the box to begin with. :)
e.g.
2 circuits in box Breaker #'s 4 & 5 (Tie barred) and # 26
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I have a much simpler method. I test all the wires with a voltage detector.
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Yeah. Good.
Problem is, I have 40 circuits. I don't want to keep running back and forth switching breakers and testing circuits. This way I know which circuit breakers are involved and just flip em.
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Some people label their breaker box so they know what they are. If you have two circuits for your kitchen, you shut them off when working in the kitchen. No real need to run back and forth, though you can if you need the exercise.
Good luck!
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I bought the house 3 years ago. None of my handy work has required any electrical changes/upgrades. Now I've re-done 2 circuits I've discovered problems. I mean, there were 2 wall outlets on the same circuit right next to each other. Hidden under the stairwell. What the hell is that all about?
I'm trying to re-label the breaker box. I've discovered that a fair number of breakers are mislabeled. I have 4 (yes 4!) breakers for the kitchen. There are 4 light fixtures and 6 wall sockets.Thay also happen to control a light fixture in a hallway. I think whoever did the original wiring was a real yahoo. Or some wierd changes were made afterwards. The house is only 18 years old so at least I know I'm dealing with new wire and all copper.
The list stuck to the box was done in a half-assed way to begin with. Few labels seem to match the actual circuits. Maybe they did at one time but not now.
I just felt a new J-box would cause less confusion if labeled for the new circuits. So I'm going to label any I add or change along with new labels on the breaker box.
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Andy replies: Having a larger number of breakers for the kitchen is a good thing. Modern appliances have a heavier draw , so it wouldn't be unusual. For instance ; 1 dual breaker for the 220 electric stove 1 breaker for the GFI wall outlets and refrig which includes garbage disp and dishwasher 1 breaker for overhead lights 1 20A breaker dedicated to the microwave oven
If the electrician also ran an additional low amperage light fixture in the hallway fromthe kitchen lights, , it doesn't mean a thing except that he knew the wiring and breaker had the capacity and decided to use it.
However, electricians are notoriously poor record keepers as far as labelling the breakers. By the time they get around to that, everything has been done and tested and they want to go have a beer. If you take the time to do the job yourself, you will never regret it.. A companion with a nite lite and a walkytalky are very handy. Othewise, use a radio turned WAY up..... It takes an hour or so, but worth the trouble. Use labels that you can understand, and DON'T use abbreviations if you can help it. I'm still trying to find what is controlled by one of my breakers labelled "WPO" by the electrician. Not a big thing, but tugs at my mind.... :>)))))
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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I rewired the end of our house and I ended up with a couple big 5" square J boves. I labelled the cover, identifying where each cable entry went and what breaker they were on. Just be sure you "key" the orientation. Use a sharpie pen and then shoot the cover with clear lacquer to preserve the writing.
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kitchens should have at least 2 seperate 20 amp GFCI receptable circuits, and the fridge should be on its own breaker NO GFCI fridge! plus seperate 220 for electric stove and overhead lights can share with other light circuits in home, Seperate non GFCI for dishwasher too
With kitchens trhe more circuits the better!
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