Moving refrigerator : Which side down?

We have to move a side-by-side refrigerator in a minivan, which means it can't be done upright. The general opinion seems to be that if you move it on its side, then let it stand a day after the move before you turn it on, and it'll be fine. On the net and web however, there is more detailed but conflicting information.
- Lay the fridge down with the suction line below, or pointing downward as it exits the compressor housing. The reasoning seems to be that the suction line is larger and there aren't any valves in it, so the oil can drain back faster compared to the compressor outlet side.
- Have the suction line above, because oil won't flow into the suction side, and the outlet side is closed by the compressor valves, so oil won't go there either.
Which side is better? It oil does migrate upward, is it necessary that every drop come back down, or is a little oil fine and will eventually come down as the compressor operates?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nexus7 wrote:

Just don't plug it in for 24 hours or so after move.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nexus7 wrote:

up if necessary(other than dolly should be on side). They do talk about letting it set before turning it on.
see http://www.geappliances.com/search/fast/infobase/10000318.htm
--reed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think the reason to get the oil back down into the compressor is to make sure it is lubricated before starting it up. I don't think it would matter if 100% of the oil wasn't returned to the compressor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The information about letting the oil drain back to the sump is probably correct. But there is a more important consideration. The compressor is suspended in the middle of the canister via rubber grommets pressed into four springs that are welded to the base of the compressor canister. This is part of the noise isolation design. By placing the fridge on its side the heavy compressor will flop on its side and may pop out of one or more grommets from its spring mount(s). If you run you van over a rough road the pop out is very likely. When you set the fridge upright again everytime the compressor starts or stops its torque will fling the compressor to hit the canister with a thunk. The canister is hermetically sealed so you cannot do any repairs. Over time the wires will fracture and you get a short circuit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nexus7 wrote:

Hi,
This may help....
http://www.applianceaid.com/faq-side.html
When you get the fridge to the location you want it....keep the fridge in the up-rite position for at least the same amount of time that the refrigerator was laying down to help any oil in the lines to drain back into the compressor before plugging it back in.
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Especially if its a new/expensive fridge, I'd rent a pickup truck-- maybe $50/day in my area. If its a short move, Home Depot rents them for $19.95 for an hour and a half.
Jos.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FWIW-
Home Depot trucks are only for moving material purchased from HD, I found this out when trying to "rent" their truck.
cheers Bob
I'd just rent a U-Haul pickup, much cheaper than a new fridge
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So buy a two by four ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joseph E. Johnston wrote:

Thanks all for the replies. We moved it in a pickup rented from a big box store, but it was a long drive and it got tilted as we took it up the ramps, and steps, so I let it stand for about 8 hours before I turned it on. It is working fine.
I bought some sheets of backerboard, since I needed those anyway, and they are messy to transport. For the use of a truck for a few hours, this is hard to beat. Every truck rental company charges by the mile; at $0.50 to $1 a mile, things can get expensive unless you really are moving locally.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.