mounting a safe

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I just received a very nice fireproof safe that has no mounting hardware. So it's fireproof etc but not thief proof. It's about 2 X 2 X 2.
I'd like to mount the sucker down with something. I'm thinking about strapping it down to the floor by wrapping angle iron around up the left side across the top and down the right side leaving ears at the bottom. Kind of like an upside down U. Then drill into the slab and bolt the ears down to the floor.
It won't insure that a determined thief won't just cut off the bolts and unstrap it but it will definitely take longer.
Welcome for all comments/ideas?
Thanks!
Djay
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encapsulate it in concrete
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wrote:

That would certainly make it safer! ;)
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as long as the floor underneath withstands the weight. :-p
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djay wrote:

How heavy is it? And is it really a safe, or just a fireproof cabinet with a combination lock? If it has casters, you can unbolt those and use those holes to add a steel plate to the bottom, extending past the sides, that you can bolt to the floor. The most secure safe is one nobody knows about- hide it in a closet or piece of furniture, with what looks like a solid panel in front of it, made out of thin plywood. Magnetic catches are great for things like that- you whack the panel with your hand to get it to pop off, or put a piece of metal on one spot on the back of the panel, and use a felt-covered magnet as the handle to pull the panel off without leaving tell-tale marks on it. And whatever you do, resist the urge to show it off to friends and relatives. All sorts of ways to add a secret compartment to a house, though not as easy as the old days when houses had all sorts of built-in cabinetry.
-- aem sends...
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It is right at 100 lbs. It's a fireproof safe meaning it has the actuator arms that go from the door into the wall of the safe after the lever is turned. Right now it's in a walk-in closet and blends very well with the rest of the crap the wife has in there (boxes of Shtuff). No casters, just 4 ea 1.5" diameter plastic nubs (about 1/8 thick).
Djay
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Did you just buy it, I just bought one at HD that came with brackets to bolt it down from the inside, check out the safes web site, some safes have an area made to be drilled through if you use the proper gasket and bracket.
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wrote:

Did you just buy it, I just bought one at HD that came with brackets to bolt it down from the inside, check out the safes web site, some safes have an area made to be drilled through if you use the proper gasket and bracket.
This one didn't come with any mounting hardware... b 4 I drill into it, I'll call the manufacturer for any tips. I think putting holes in it would definitely drop the fire rating?
Djay
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It will but not to any appreciable degree. The floor on the bottom and the washer on the top tend to keep the steam inside the safe in the event of a fire, and the average residential fire does not blaze for as long as the rating of the safe, so you should be OK.
--

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About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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djay wrote:

Simple.
Drill one or more holes in the floor of the safe then use these holes for bolts anchored in the floor.
I made a 2x2' form from scrap 2x4s, used bits of conduit in the right place, and filled the form with concrete. I made five of these. The bottom one had a bolt anchored in the concrete.
I was able to attach threaded rods to the imbedded bolts and thread the remaining four slabs on the rod. The bit of the rod stickup up from the fifth block was used to secure the safe.
Now, instead of a safe weighing about 70 pounds, the goblins will have to make off with a blob weighing almost 500 pounds.
Another trick. You can put a switch inside the door of the safe with hidden wires going to your 'silent holdup alarm' circuit. This switch on the safe's door can be disabled by another switch in a secret location. To use the safe normally, you flip the secret switch before opening the safe. If a squint, scrot, cut-purse, evil-doer, slope, or drippy is holding a gun to your head, you don't flip the secret switch.
A pistol among the safe's contents has obvious uses.
Note: There are two general kinds of safes: fire safes and security safes. Fire safes (i.e., typical 'Sentry' brand) can be opened with a hatchet. Security safes made of tool-resistant steel are much harder for a gremlin to open but get really hot inside.
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So my new HD Sentry safe isnt safe? How unsafe is it against theft.
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wrote:

So my new HD Sentry safe isnt safe? How unsafe is it against theft.
I watched a show called "it takes a thief" and this guy litterally ripped out safes etc and took them with him to open later.
My goal is to make the "thievery" take as long as possible.
DJay
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If you feel theft is real posible, let them have the safe and Hide valuables, its all a game anyway. My sentry fire safe has provisions to drill holes, it would seem to ruin the fire rating but Sentry included them.
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ransley wrote:

Much better, in some ways, than a cigar box. The downside is that it's easier to hide a cigar box. A fire safe will prevent theft by the 'dash and grab' crew but against a determined thief with a smattering of time, not so much.
At my local safe company, they have a display of a Sentry fire safe ripped apart with a roofing hatchet. The construction consists of two thin layers of steel encasing about two inches of concrete. It's the concrete that gets the fire rating - the steel is just a cover. Might as well be plastic. If you can chop a hole in a hunk of corrugated iron, you can chop a hole in most fire safes - the steel isn't much thicker.
I think the most fire and theft resistant safe for the home is the round kind that fits inside the floor. To install it, you rent a 8" or 10" or whatever concrete hole saw for the day, cut out a plug from your foundation, lower the safe and add some cement.
Such as safe won't burn, you can't reach the recessed knob with a tool, and it's REAL easy to conceal. I've got one in a closet, a bit of floor tile covers the section containing the hole, and some nasty-looking underwear - complete with brown stains - covers the tile.
Security safes are "T" rated: T10, T15, T50. This used to refer to the number of thousands of dollars an insurance company would go for and was directly related to how much trouble it would take a thief to crack the sucker. What with inflation, I don't think the numbers refer, any more, to actual money.
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HeyBub wrote:

But there are a whole class of data rated safes specifically designed to be both a security safe and to protect the contents from heat damage.
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So all of these slabs were under the safe? The conduit allowed the thread-all to pass to/through the next slab etc?

I like this idea - but sounds like I'd have to buy a silent alarm service....

Loaded pistol will be in the safe - along with the other documents that need fire protection.

I bought this one as a "dual use" to protect stuff inside from both heat and naredowells. Thanks for the insight.
Djay
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Why not just get a safety deposit box at your local bank??? Are they that expensive to rent???
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I dunno - banks have already screwed me enough! lol I may look into it though.
Djay
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Other problems with SD boxes at banks: - They don't like it when you walk in with guns to put in the SD box. - Gun in bank SD box won't do you any good at home. - can't get in SD box after hours.
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You do realize we are talking about a 2'X2' fire safe for important documents , ect. , don't you??? Not gonna get to many guns in a 2'X2' FIRE safe...A GUN SAFE is for guns and you should keep one hand gun on you.. Not gonna do you much good in a safe even at home...I still think the best place for very important documents , cash , jewlery , ect. is a safety deposit box....
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