Mothballing a swimming pool

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Neighboring community announced they will not be opening their municipal swimming pool this summer to save money. They say it costs $100,000 to operate for the season, but they must spend $50K to mothball it while it's idle, so only $50K saved.
Wow. What needs to be done to mothball a pool?
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Drain it and sweep it out after it's dry. Sounds odd to me. Half the cost to run it for a year is what it takes to not run it? I'd look into it more?
Rich
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Rich wrote:

stand a chance of never using it again.
s
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"Steve Barker" wrote:

Aye, they drained one around here a few years ago. Then it rained, raising the water table up to the point where it floated the pool a few inches.
That turned out to be a big mess.
Jon
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Jon Danniken wrote:

exactly, and people say concrete don't float.. LOL!
steve
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Steve Barker wrote:

During WWII I believe there were a number of ships or barges built out of concrete.
TDD
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On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 20:19:51 -0800, "Jon Danniken"

Drained my pool just last year: For what I know it was the first time.
My water table is 385' below the desert and will never cause my pool to float.
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Jon Danniken wrote:

up in had a huge late 1940s outdoor municipal pool, like Olympic size 12 lane, plus a T with a dive area. They emptied it every year. But the concrete was thick and heavily rebarred, and on that end of town, there was a thick layer of gravel about 10-12 feet down under everything. (as a wee lad, I saw LOTS of basements go in, less than a mile from there.) Water table spikes were not a problem around there. A mile the other direction, however, they just had a century flood, last summer.
-- aem sends...
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lost revenue
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Dunno. If the surrounding soil is expansive, there could be concerns with the walls cracking with the pool empty - maybe need to do something to brace the walls?
Jerry
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Jerry wrote:

more likely than walls cracking, but I'm no engineer.
(Same concept as why residential sand'n'vinyl pools are never emptied all the way...)
-- aem sends....
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aemeijers wrote:

Well also, on Vinyl, the stuff shrinks real bad after being exposed to chlorine. If you let it dry out, they usually tear off the top when you refill them. I wouldn't even take a vinyl pool down half way. I used to just pull the hose off the skimmer of our above ground and let that be the winter level.
s
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If it's currently covered and empty of water, nothing. -----
- gpsman
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wrote:

Maybe you misunderstood or they weren't clear. It may very well be that what they meant was that even with the pool emptied and shut down, there will still be expenses for insurance, security, general maintenance, and other fixed costs that will still need to be paid whether it is open for swimming or not.
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On Feb 25, 7:38pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Exactly. Probably $50 to empty it, and $49,950 for insurance in case someone falls in.
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Bryce wrote:

that's bs. All it takes is a super shocking treatment and a good cover.
s
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Steve Barker wrote:

Nobody makes covers that big.
-- aem sends....
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aemeijers wrote:

Floating covers are quite commonplace for municipal pools. They retain the heat and reduce evaporation. But the liability issues remain, just as they would with an empty pool.
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Next to a school, years ago a community pool was drained for repair. A local kid died after he dove from the diving board into an empty pool. Kids climbed the fence at night for a swim. No lights on.
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Oren wrote:

Darwin at work.
TDD
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