Mixing high & low voltage wires in electrical conduit?

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Apparently not in your case.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

See dummy? You can quote using google.
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I didn't want you to get lost again
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Who are you talking to this time?
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G Henslee wrote:

We have to remember that some people have no idea how news browsers can be set -- that is, so that they do NOT display already read items. Also, other posts sometimes get between others and make it impossible to follow a thread without some context!
--
Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@cc.ysu.edu Youngstown State University
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An electrical switch needs to be rated for the application.
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In my city you can't, and Brinks (who's brand alarm I have) wouldn't install in the same conduit as line voltage.
There's probably very good reasons for this, the main ones I'm thinking of is interference with the low voltage devices, and inexperienced do-it-yourselfers getting zapped by the line voltage wires by mistaking them for the LV wires.
There are at least three things I can think of to do what you want.
You can use wireless alarm sensors. Not my favorite idea, but many folks like them.
You can run another conduit specifically for low voltage devices. That's what I did when I renovated my patio, using 1" conduit. I can run CAT 5, coax, alarm, LV, and anything else I want except line voltage, which has it's own conduit.
You can run the low voltage wires underground without conduit. You can use either low voltage or line voltage wire that's rated for underground burial, and use metal conduit from underground to inside your house and garage, which should make any code inspector happy.
The last two depends on the construction around your garage, of course. If you can do both, I suggest the separate conduit, where in the future you can run additional wiring with ease, and they'll be protected from moisture and such.
Pagan
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Pagan wrote:

this is not permitted with separate wires. With cables it is up to the Authority Having Jurisdiction (ispspector) who, I think, would not be happy.
As noted the line voltage circuit could produce noise in the LV cable through capacitive and inductive coupling.
Bud--
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Actually, my situation is the reverse. I already have the low voltage alarm wires run in rigid metal conduit up the garage wall and across the ceiling to a centrally located heat sensor. I was hoping that maybe I could use that same conduit to also run cable for a ceiling light that I need to relocate. Of course, I could add a parallel run of conduit, but I was hoping to avoid the racecourse look of multiple conduit runs snaking across my ceiling (in my mind, one is more than enough visually :).
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Pull the alarm wires out of the conduit and run them alongside it. Then use the conduit for the power line.
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This is what the code says;
725.55 Separation from Electric Light, Power, Class 1, NonPower-Limited Fire Alarm Circuit Conductors, and Medium Power Network-Powered Broadband Communications Cables. (A) General. Cables and conductors of Class 2 and Class 3 circuits shall not be placed in any cable, cable tray, compartment, enclosure, manhole, outlet box, device box, raceway, or similar fitting with conductors of electric light, power, Class 1, nonpower-limited fire alarm circuits, and medium power network-powered broadband communications circuits unless permitted by 725.55(B) through (J). Section 725.55(A) specifically includes cables of Class 2 and Class 3 circuits. Jackets of listed Class 2 and Class 3 cables do not have sufficient construction specifications to permit them to be installed with electric light, power, Class 1, nonpower-limited fire alarm circuits, and medium power network-powered broadband communications cables. Failure of the cable insulation due to a fault could lead to hazardous voltages being imposed on the Class 2 or Class 3 circuit conductors. (B) Separated by Barriers. Class 2 and Class 3 circuits shall be permitted to be installed together with Class 1, nonpower-limited fire alarm and medium power network-powered broadband communications circuits where they are separated by a barrier.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com writes:

So if I am reading the code English properly, what I am asking is not allowed even if the 110v (Class 1) wires are enclosed in Romex cabling unless there is some additional "barrier" between the power and alarm wires. Right?
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This is not allowed. SQLit had the answer some time back... Romex does not belong in ANY conduit to begin with...
It is not required to be in conduit unless protecting it from physical damage, I would 'suppose' it would exceed the fill requirements of the conduit you are proposing to use, and it should not be mixed with low voltage or alarm signaling wiring because of the insulation rating differences.
Many alarm panels use semiconductor inputs, which sense either a opening or closing of a circuit. Placing the wiring within close proximity to other wiring can cause interference, and the alarm may either trip for no reason or fail to trip when it's needed.
There is no need to place your romex in conduit. If you must use conduit, use a separate one and THHN wire. You can also use flexible BX cable with the appropriate fittings.
Jake
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wrote:

False. There is *nothing* in the NEC that prohibits running Romex in conduit.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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According to the NEC, you can only have signalling voltage and line voltage in the same enclosure if it's a listed assembly. (Furnace, air conditioner, etc.) Short answer, no!
Dan
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