Milwaukee sawzall "The Hatchet"


I noticed Milwaukee makes a compacted version of the sawzall with a rotating handle. My old sawzall just died and this one is intriging as I consider a replacement.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Does anyone knows if this cuts as well as the traditional sawzall? or this is a light duty tool?
Thanks,
MC
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I noticed that Milwaukee makes a compacted form of their sawzall which they call the "Hatchet", with the handle being able to rotate in different angles and takes up much less room then their normal sawzall. Link here:
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Too bad you missed the close out sale last year at HD. I bought one for around $40.00! While not as powerful as their larger saws it is quite capable. We use it in our remodeling business. It is great in tight spaces. The lower amperage had not been a problem for us. Plenty of power.
cm

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I would think it would be a great tool (especially at that price!) to have for many remodeling jobs. The bigger reciprocating saws are overkill in many instances. If you're a contractor and you do a lot of demolition, no question, get something with some oomph. But if you're not, the smaller units would probably suffice 90% of the time.
R
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I bought one at HD during a clearance sale. Forget the price, but it was a reduced price. I like that the 10' cord is removable (Quik-Loc), the 1/4 turn blade latch, and adjustable foot. (no tools needed)
The ONLY fault I've found is the handle adjustment button is so close to the thumb during work that you can hit it and the handle will slip up (from pistol position to horizontal).
The button should be in another location to prevent this from happening. Oh, well.
Great tool for what I use it for around the house.
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says...

I found the same thing. The release button is right under your thumb and the release action is so smooth it is easy to move the handle.
--
Dennis


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$40? Are you kidding?

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On Tue, 13 Oct 2009 22:09:32 -0400, "MiamiCuse"

You might find the Hatchet on model # 6524-20 (mine)
A newer version model # 6524-21 (new) changes things. Price what you buy, I'm saying.
The 6524-21 will cost you more, but the 6524-20 does a fine job.
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It's 7 amps and has a 3/4" stroke so it's not a Sawzall replacement. I've never used it, but Milwaukee makes good stuff.
R
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As Rico says, its only 7 amps (which is what my ancient Sawzall w/ 3/4" stroke is)
I think the Super Sawzall is like 11+ amps but I hear there is now a "Super Dooper" Sawzall (1 1/4" stroke) that is 15 amps!
I borrowed a friend's Porter Cable TigerClaw 11.5 amps. It has the ability to swivel at a couple joints...which I thought, at first, was just a gimmick. After using in close quarters (crawlspace demo of 1930 galv water system) .....the swivel capability is useful & not just a gimick. The more powerful motor cut WAY faster than my ancient Sawzall.
Considering the tools on the market & depending your use (& I'm a huge Milwaukee owner / user) you have to decide which is more important swivel or power.
I would recommend against a 7 amp motor (I have an old one & I consider it more than a bit wimpy). If I was in the market for a new Sawzall, I'd chose between the 10 amp TIgerClaw & the 15 amp SUPER Sawzall.
The TigerClaw can twisted into all sorts of strange configurations ...Sawzall makes a unit where the handle can be swiveled similar to their right angle drill kit. (big deal?)
But the 15 amps Sawzall is also enticing....
cheers Bob
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wrote:

As Rico says, its only 7 amps (which is what my ancient Sawzall w/ 3/4" stroke is)
I think the Super Sawzall is like 11+ amps but I hear there is now a "Super Dooper" Sawzall (1 1/4" stroke) that is 15 amps!
I borrowed a friend's Porter Cable TigerClaw 11.5 amps. It has the ability to swivel at a couple joints...which I thought, at first, was just a gimmick. After using in close quarters (crawlspace demo of 1930 galv water system) .....the swivel capability is useful & not just a gimick. The more powerful motor cut WAY faster than my ancient Sawzall.
Considering the tools on the market & depending your use (& I'm a huge Milwaukee owner / user) you have to decide which is more important swivel or power.
I would recommend against a 7 amp motor (I have an old one & I consider it more than a bit wimpy). If I was in the market for a new Sawzall, I'd chose between the 10 amp TIgerClaw & the 15 amp SUPER Sawzall.
The TigerClaw can twisted into all sorts of strange configurations ...Sawzall makes a unit where the handle can be swiveled similar to their right angle drill kit. (big deal?)
But the 15 amps Sawzall is also enticing....
cheers Bob
Thanks, I will definitely check into the Tiger Claw.
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fftt wrote:

Hi, I love my Tiger saw. Needed some getting used to but it is very handy in confined space. My circular saw is Milwaukee tho.
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wrote:

My Milwaulee Sawzall just died and so I am looking for something that would be convenient to use to cut at tight angles and in the attic. May be I need a traditional sawzall and a tight angle one for different situations.
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says...

I have one and it has quickly become a favorite. The Hatchet and my cordless Dewalt are the two recips I take to the job. When folded in half it can fit in the space between two studs 16" apart. It can be switched from straight cutting to orbital (for faster cuts in wood). The blade release is the best I have encountered, not sure if the other Milwaukees are the same. I use mine for remodeling and actually prefer the shorter, 3/4" stroke. It is much easier to make a cut in a tight spot without the blade jamming into the back of a recess.
--
Dennis


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I just checked on eBay - it's interesting to see that there are a lot of the cordless 18v Hatchet's for sale, without battery or charger. I guess that's from people buying a set of battery tools and selling off the items they don't need/want. If you already have an 18v Milwaukee tool with battery and charger, buying it that way would be a very cheap way of getting the tool.
R
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I just checked on eBay - it's interesting to see that there are a lot of the cordless 18v Hatchet's for sale, without battery or charger. I guess that's from people buying a set of battery tools and selling off the items they don't need/want. If you already have an 18v Milwaukee tool with battery and charger, buying it that way would be a very cheap way of getting the tool.
R
Good point. But for now I am a little concerned about getting more cordless tools from all different manufacturers. I think it may be best to stick with one cordless brand and that way the battery mileage would be highest. For recip saw I think in my case I would stick with corded versions. I tried a cordless and corded in cutting cast iron pipes and there is a HUGE difference.
MC
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