metric carpenter's tape

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On Sun, 02 May 2010 11:38:37 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

It's still sold in 4'x8' sheets, and 1/2 and 3/4 sheet goods are still available.

44x88 doesn't come out to 1-1/2 x 3-1/2, just by inspection (the ratios are 1:2 and 3:7).

Ceramic tile is a whole 'nother kettle. No one counts on the size of ceramic tile. No two lots are the same.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote: ...

It's pretty tough (as in akin to putting the toothpaste back into the tube) to find anything that is actually full half or quarter, tho--it's generally a 32-nd under if not metric.
--
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It can be found, particularly in "cabinet grade". I think the point earlier was that 1/32 under was really an even metric size.
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Once you cut that board, it is any measure you deem it to be. Just as we drink beer in ounces, but you pee into a cup in milliliters.
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You cut all three dimensions?

Don't know about you, but I generally pee in a toilet and it's marked 1.6 gallons. ;-)
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[snip]

That's a lot of pee ;-)
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The water is cold, too.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

An imperial tape could be more convenient when measuring for a factory size, such as marking for wall studs. (With a calculator, a metric tape can do it nicely.)
Most of my measuring is to cut pieces. A couple of years ago, a neighbor was cutting panels of plastic skirting to cover his brick underpinning. The panels were 5' (1500mm) wide. As the ground wasn't perfectly level, he needed a measurement for each end, and he had to add 5/8" for the panels to tuck under his siding.
He'd cut several wrong when I came along. First, he didn't start with precision because reading a tape in 32nds is a hassle. Second, it's easy to goof adding fractions. Third, it's hard to keep two mixed numbers straight long enough to make two cuts.
I got my metric tape and a piece of paper. After that, the measurements were easy and every piece fit nicely.
My BIL worked as a carpenter, then built himself a house. Once he showed me how to repair lightning damage to my roof. In cutting a piece less than 2 square feet, he ruined a whole sheet of pressure-treated plywood.
He needed four lengths to cut that piece. He kept trying to remember four mixed numbers long enough to climb down the ladder and make his cuts. When he kept goofing, I went up with him with a pad, but he wouldn't tell me what he measured. Writing the numbers could have saved time and lumber. A metric tape would have helped because he wouldn't have avoided mixed numbers.
Shingling alone, snapping a chalk line is more trouble than it's worth. I make spot checks with a tape measure. A metric tape works best. It's precise enough to show me if I'm starting to drift, and I don't have to remember a mixed number.
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Exactly. One can always convert but it throws another source of error into the mess.

He was incompetent and impatient. That's not unusual for a DIY'er. BTDT.

He ain't that bright either.

Why remember mixed numbers? Work in the precision you need. If 1/8" is good enough, measure everything in 1/8" increments. Remember the numerator. It's the same as remembering your 1/10s.

You're forcing the pain on yourself.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

How about the first example, where my neighbor had to measure for plastic panels to cover his underpinning.
Suppose he measures 28-5/8" at one end. From 28", he has to scan past 20 marks of varying lengths to pick out the 5/8" mark. To avoid mixed numbers, he's going to have to get his calculator and convert that to 229 eighths. Then he adds 3 for the underlap to make 232. Now, to see what that will be on his tape when he marks the plastic, he needs to use a calculator to convert 232 eights to 29". What luck! No fraction to read on the tape this time!
With a metric tape, it's 727, 2mm past the 725. He adds 15 for the underlap and marks 742 on the plastic. He doesn't have to worry about compromising precision if he reads in mm.
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I don't know, but I'd buy one. So long as you cut pieces at the proper distance, you can measure it in cubits. I found the metric system easier to use and read, particularly when doing layouts on ornamental metal. Use a simple decimal calculator instead of a conversion one you buy at the Borg that's a lot more complicated. Using a base 10 measure and a base 10 calculator. Simple.
Steve
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