Metal threshold results in ice indoors

Our front door has an aluminum alloy threshold, and we have just noticed that ice is forming on the indoor side of it; this, when it melts, will not be good for our wooden floor.
What must be happening, I am sure, is that, because the outdoor temperature is now well below freezing, water-vapor from the indoor air is condensing an freezing on the surface.
Short of (a) replacing the threshold by a wooden one or (b) cutting the aluminum one lengthwise and interposing a "thermal barrier" between the two sections, what's a good way of solving this problem?
Perce
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You get what your paid for. Get a good wood threshold and solve your problem post haste if you have wood floors!
Report back how you solved it.
Rich
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
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On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 18:27:58 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

Lift the metal threshold out. Clean and put three beads of clear silicon caulk down, maybe 1/2 inch bead or less. Place the threshold back in place. No more leaks... in or out..
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wrote:

He doesn't have leaks he has a thermal connection to the below freezing temps outside his door, that's causing humidity to freeze then thaw and will ruin his wood floor. He needs to pull up the aluminum and put down a good threshold that has a thermal break and good weather strip and then his problem will be solved.
Rich
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how about adding a good storm door? we have a steel door with metal threshold with zero troubles...... but do have a good storm door.
our home is much warmer since the metal stanly door was installed 2 years ago
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Rich wrote:

There must be air leaking under it to get frost on the inside.
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Van Chocstraw wrote:

It could... aluminum is a good thermal conductor. If it's cold enough outside, and the aluminum is directly exposed to the cold, the OP's explanation seems reasonable.
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wrote:

You mean the entire 1.75" - the thickness of the door. The threshold could be siphoning off heat through conduction for either distance. If ice is forming on the inside, it certainly is. Other posters have addressed the remedy.
R
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On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 18:27:58 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

Haven't done it but B sounds good.
Until you redo the threshhold, a wet/dry vac might help get rid of your ice. Use it while hitting the ice with something to break it.

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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Is it smooth ice or frost? Frost won't damage your floor.
I grew up in a 19th Century house in VT. There were no storm doors. When it was well below zero, door handles would sometimes turn white. No wetness resulted.
In NC, sometimes I'll open curtains and find smooth ice on windows. This will rot windowsills.
The difference is the dew point. White frost formed in VT because the dew point indoors was below freezing. So the frost evaporated without thawing. In NC, the smooth ice in windows is frozen condensation. The water condensed above freezing and will melt when the window warms.
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On 12/23/08 02:23 pm E Z Peaces wrote:

The ice/frost is not in contact with the floor. But when it melts the floor will get wet.
Perce
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

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On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 18:27:58 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

Place a rolled up blanket, sand bags, or door draft stopper at the bottom of the door. Consider a storm door.
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On 12/23/08 04:59 pm Phisherman wrote:

I didn't mention that this is a double door -- approx. 6' opening. Would storm doors work with this setup?
Perce
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