metal roofing - can a nail gun be used


My pop and i built a pole barn 20 odd years ago that is still standing tall. we used a metal (i think tin) roof that we hand nailed to the purlins with the standard nail with a rubber ring around the head to keep out water.
we are pricing out building another pole barn. this time, we are going to use metal siding in addition to the metal roof. i am considering purchasing a nail gun to do the job.
can a nail gun be used to install metal roof/siding?
how does the nail gun prevent applying too much force and crusing the rib on the metal sheet being installed?
is a framing nailer or a different nail gun used?
direct experience is greatly appreciated!
thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mar 5, 5:52 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The crew that assembled my building a few years ago only used their nail guns on structural components and anchoring wood to the concrete. All the roofing and siding was done by hand, the crew claiming that it offered far better control because of the variations in the underlying wood members. When completed they went over the roof again and snugged up a few potential leakers. They seemed to be very proud of their titanium hammers on the job. Some buildings use screws, but these tend to be located on flat parts and not on the ribs. Visitng some building sites would be very informative to see for yourself what the best prctices are today. Good luck.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5 Mar 2007 15:52:24 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I have built several pole barns and I have never seen any nailguns setup for neoprene washer nails. I dont think they exist. You MUST use washer nails. These days, most people use the screws with the neoprene washers. Until last year I always used the nails just because they are much cheaper than screws. But I built a shed and decided that I night want to expand it in the future. Tin comes off much easier with screws, so I used them. They go in quite easily with a cordless drill-driver. Just keep lots of batteries in the charger, and I recommend a corded drill for the times all the batteries wear out. Use a cordless for the roof and a corded for the walls if you must. Dealing with cords on a metal roof are a pain. One other thing. Those screws are made to drill thru the tin, but one slip and they will drill into your hands or other body parts. I did this, and after a very painful experience, I learned to take an awl or strong nail and punch the holes first.
On modern steel, you nail in the flats, NOT in the ribs. (especially when using screws).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the replies.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.