Melted Rubber Feet - How to Fix or Replace?

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I lent a yamaha keyboard to a friend without realizing that the rubber feet had melted. Now the keyboard leaves a gummy mess on any place it's put.
What can I do to remedy the situation?
Thanks.
Ellen
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Go to your local hardware stores and see if they have any similar- sized feet that stick on with double-sided sticky tape thast is already on the replacement feet. If you can remove the stickies, the new feet need to be at least as thick to allow some air to circulate under the keyboard. The new feet should be placed fairly near the location of the old feet as the keyboard case is probably a little stronger wher the feet were originally located. I have used the stick-on feet many times, the only thing is to have the old area cleaned off so the new feet have a good base to stick on. I would keep the keyboard placed in it normal position once the new feet are stuck on so there is continual pressure on the feet for about a month. Thaat will help to ensure that the feet are REALLY stuck on. Good Luck!
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Thanks, Bob. If the sides of the feet are also gummy, they will get on things even with new feet on top. Would silicone caulk stick to the rubber and encapsulate it? If so, then I can try new feet.
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Ellen wrote:
(...)

Don't bother.
I believe Bob meant that you should completely remove and discard the existing feet. They are probably attached with adhesive, so you will want to carefully pry them up with (perhaps) a thin screwdriver blade.
If the feet attach to the keyboard with a screw, you will want to remove that fastener first.
Check your local electronics retailer or reliable web supplier for replacements: http://www.digikey.com / Search term: adhesive feet
Consider replacement feet that space the keyboard somewhat higher off the surface as the originals did.
Best of luck
--Winston
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Replace them.
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Ellen wrote:

Hi, Tehy are either stick on or little screw would hold them to the case. Or it could be snap in type. If you can't find one replacement, replace all four as a matched set.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

Chuckle. Back in the stone age, when PCs were beige (and expensive), I made a decent side income buying and selling used ones. (buy 10 for 200, resell 4 or 5 for 200 each, etc.) Missing/yucky feet were a constant problem. Most of the online electronic supply houses (mpja.com or similar) have all sorts of feet available, at a fraction of the price Rat Shack or the Borg charges. Take the old feet off, and clean the bottom of the case, then install the new ones. Covering the old feet will not work.
Other thought- look on YamahaUSA web site. They may have parts available. Sometimes vendors will even send out trivial parts like this free, as a goodwill gesture. If you had the problem, other owners did too.
Bizarre side note- I had a pair of basically unworn Sears work boots where the soles did the same thing- turned to sticky jello after about a year, sitting in the closet. Would have cost more to get resoled than I paid for them, so in the trash they went.
-- aem sends...
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Thanks, guys! I'll take them off and get new ones.
I especially appreciate the explanations of how to remove them as I never did so before.
On cleaning, what would be the best thing? Being a girl, nail polish remover comes to mind, but what do guys use?
Ellen
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Ellen wrote:

Is the case plastic or metal? If plastic, do NOT use nail polish remover, which (if it is the real stuff) is basically acetone. It will make the case mushy. Use Goof-off, or dollar-a-can hairspray. A pencil eraser often helps to ball up the adhesive residue and make it easier to remove. If case is metal, acetone will work, but don't let it set too long, or it could hurt the paint.
-- aem sends...
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A little goo won't matter. Remove the old feet and any rubber bits. Leave the goo alone. Apply new feet.
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aemeijers wrote:

Denatured alcohol probably would work nicely. It would take quite some effort to damage the plastic, other that dulling the surface.
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Ellen wrote:

If they have a wife or girlfriend, n.p. remover. If not, lacquer thinner :o)
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On Tue 23 Jun 2009 08:53:39p, Ellen told us...

Nail polish could ruin the surface of the bottom of the keyhboard case or any other surface, especially if it's plastic, or if it has a furniture finish. I would use Goo Gone or lighter fluid.
--
Wayne Boatwright
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

And we care about the bottom of a keyboard where the feet stick on because..........?
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On Wed 24 Jun 2009 02:42:25p, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net told us...

Maybe you wouldn't, but I would. I don't like to mar finishes, even they are largely unseen.
Some nail polish remover formulations are known to actually deform plastic, not just ruin the surface finish.
To each his own...
--
Wayne Boatwright
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wrote:

A can of acetone while smoking is the manly way.
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Woosey. A hammer and a chisel is the manly way.
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wrote:

Home depot or Lowes sells rubber tips. Take an old one with you when you shop as there are different sizes.
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Ellen wrote:

Replacements might be found at a hardware store. Simplest solution might be to remove the rubber and replace with a dab of silicone caulk. I use sil. for pads on lots of things - easy to shape and, if not even, shave off a little when it cures.
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Ellen wrote:

I would contact Yamaha first and say "I really really like your products but those gummy feet are messing up everything they touch". You might be surprised and find free replacements in the mail.
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