Meaning Of 150 amp Service: At 115 V, Or At 220 V ?

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Hello:
When they say a house has, e.g., 150 amp service, is that 150 amps at 115 V, or 150 amps at 220 V ?
Thanks, Bob
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220

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Yes. And by the way, it's the same thing. If you have two 115V lines @ 150 amps, it's also 150 amps @ 220V.
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TCS wrote:

What are inside the feed wires? 2 hots @120V each, and a neutral? The neutral and ground are usually connected at the panel. So how the electricity figure which way to go, to the neutral, or to the ground?
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It figures it out by asking the water. That's what the wire is for that connects the panel to the water pipe - it's a communication link.
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is that way power is measured in watts? because it goes thru watter?

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Yep! Thats it exactly!
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- Hello World -

- Nehmo - For simplicity, let's only concern ourselves with _one_ hot (black), the neutral (white), and the ground (bare or green). Also let's just consider an instant in the changing Alternating Current (AC) cycle, when the hot is conventionally-called positive. Electricity of the household line-current type can only travel in a complete circuit the circuit has to form a loop. So if a load, a lamp (a lamp with a metal housing that is grounded to the ground prong of a 3-prong plug) for example, is placed between the hot and the neutral (the normal situation), the electricity goes, from the panel, through the hot, through the lamp, then back through the neutral back to the panel. The ground wire does nothing because there is no complete circuit that includes the ground wire.
But suppose something goes wrong: let's say an insulation-stripped hot wire inside the lamp now touches the lamp housing, a short. Now when you turn on the lamp, which allows current to the hot wire, the electricity goes from the panel, through the hot, through the short to the lamp housing, through the ground prong of the plug, through the ground wire, and back to the panel where, since the resistance of the circuit is low and the current is thus high, the breaker opens. The ground wire served its purpose.
That's how the electricity knows where to go; it goes only where the circuit is complete.
--
*********************
* Nehmo Sergheyev *
  Click to see the full signature.
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Short answer is "yes" ;^)
A home with reasonably modern wiring will have electric service with 3 wires: 2 hots and a neutral. You'll get 220 (or thereabouts) across both hots, and 110 (or thereabouts) from either to the neutral. Both hot wires go thru the main breaker, which is really two breakers connected together mechanically so if one trips the other does also.
Bottom line: if you're using 110V you can draw 150 amps off each leg (300 total if evenly distributed), if you're using 220 you can pull 150 amps total. In the real world you're probably using a mixture so it gets a little more complicated.
Eric Law

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This answer being for most of north america, assuming that you don't specifically ask for something different, in areas where 208V residential service is also available, and assuming you're willing to tolerate a little laxity of of terminology.
What you're actually getting is a nominal 33 Kilowatts, which can manifest as 150 amps at 220V, or 300 amps at 110V, or any pro-rated combination between.
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This is Turtle.
150 amps in 115 volt service or 300 amps in a 220 volt service.
You can have 15 --- 20 amp single 115 volt breakers or 7.5 --- 20 amp double pole breakers at 220 volt service.
E-mail me if you want to discuss it.
TURTLE
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How do you figure???????.........Ross

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WRONG. It means 150 amps at 220 volts.

Wrong again. It's perfectly OK for the ratings of the individual branch circuit breakers to add up to a *lot* more than the rating of the main disconnect. This is because the branch circuits will not _all_ be in use, at full capacity, at the same time.

The OP would be better off posting his questions publicly so that others have the opportunity to correct your errors.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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On 1/20/2005 8:40 AM US(ET), Doug Miller took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

I certainly hope so. I have a 200 amp panel, and if I add all the breaker sizes up (including the double 220v ones), it comes to 660 amps. Just the 20 amp breakers alone add up to 280.

--
Bill

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Give 'em hell, Doug!
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Thanks Doug...thats why I posted the "How do you figure" comment...there was a serious violation of ohms law in the Turtles comment....Ross
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This is Turtle.
I have say I got it backwards to be completely saying the story. You can get 150 amps on each leg . Then you fill in the blanks as to using 220 volt sevice of both legs. Then when you say the box is only good for 150 amps at 220 volt service. Your saying your drawing 150 amps from each leg and that adds up to 300 amps you will really be drawing from the box with 150 amps from each leg. When you say 220 service breaker in the 150 amp box they are drawing 300 amps in the real world. You may try to explain it differently but it mounts up to 300 amps by way of 120 volt draw.
The meaning of 220 volt service at 150 amps means you can pull 150 amps off each leg by doing so. This amounts to 300 amps if I use single breakers. Now you & Mr. Miller please explain what is wrong with this info ?
TURTLE
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And that's backward.
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This is Turtle.
I have been working with 3 phase 480 volt systems for the last two weeks and I seem to get everything assbackwards when I get off 3 phase and get back on single phase stuff again. If your 3 phasing your thinking 1/3 and not 1/2 with single phase.
So can you forgive me for being assbackwards one time ?
TURTLE
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But of course, none of us have ever done that!....yeah right....take care Turtle....Ross
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