May I compare my well water setup to yours (3,094 usable gallons)

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On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 09:04:01 -0700 (PDT), DD_BobK wrote:

This meshes with what I'm seeing.
For me, 1 inch is 500 gallons of pool and I lose about an inch every few days.
I think a pool cover is in order!
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On Thu, 18 Aug 2011 21:45:20 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

60 x 15 = 900 sq ft
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SF Man wrote:

Presumably the water you use to keep your pool full and for irrigation is feeding back into your well, so aside from evaporation I would think that maybe 1/2 of that water is (eventually) going back into the ground water feeding your well.
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Sounds like a mighty big assumption to me. I doubt what is happening with water in his little world has any significant impact on the acquifer at 500 feet down.
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On Thu, 11 Aug 2011 16:13:47 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Someone once told me that the water we drink is a thousand years old ...
But, I don't know that for a fact ...
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SF Man wrote:

You can MAKE water by burning Hydrogen.
Virtually all other water is used water.
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This is part of the problem out there. All these people think they can have these huge expanses of lawn in basically a dessert. Eventually it gets like the oil situaton, they are using water from the aquifer at a rate faster than it is being replenished.
He has the huge tanks for fire protection, irrigation, and filling the pool. Not related to the domestic use. He has ignored obvious water wastage like the leaky pool and the zillion head lawn sprinklers because he thought the water was practically free. He probably has neighbors doing the same things.
The level of the aquifer in proximilty to his well can get pulled down to the point where he can not get enough water out of it. Around a well the aquifer will look like a bowl when the well is in use. How deep the bowl is depends on how much water is being drawn out and how fast water can move through the substrate around the well. If the lowering is prolonged then he needs a deeper well. Otherwise he can wait it out and the level will slowly recover.
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On Fri, 12 Aug 2011 05:30:18 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc wrote:

That's what I'm doing (I have no other choice).
In the last two days, the tank level changed by 20 inches.
That's 20x40 gallons per inch (approx.) which is 800 gallons.
So, it looks like the well, in the middle of the dry season (roughly March or April to December), can only supply about 400 gallons per day.
So, my 'ration' will have to be 400 gallons per day ... like it or not.
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Or is it. IIRC you said your pump requires a 30minute "off" befoe it starts again. Your well may be recovering a lot faster than that.
You perhaps could put the pump on an adjustable timer so it shuts off _before_ it runs out of water and then pumps again in, say, 15 minutes.
Harry K
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You really don't know anything about aquifers do you? The water he sprays on the lawn and leaking out of the pool does not end up back in his well.
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On Fri, 12 Aug 2011 05:16:35 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc wrote:

I asked about and got a whole bunch of answers.
Basically, nobody really knows where their water comes from out here. Everybody seems to have a 400 to 800 foot deep well (it's hill country so just the elevation changes are that much easily). Some have multiple wells on their property.
Most have larger holding tanks than I have (they have three and four, while I only have two). There's some kind of zoning thing where you're better off with multiple small tanks than one big one.
Anyway, I don't know where the water comes from - but - I'm leaning toward the theory that it's a thousand years old water myself.
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At the risk of venturing a radical proposal, why not practice some water conservancy? If you are running your well dry, you are impacting the water table, which no doubt is impacting any neighbors' usage as well.
If the irrigation is not being used for consumables, switch to indigenous species that are used to your local precipitation. I know everybody likes green, but water is a precious commodity in this century. Leave some behind so your kids can fill their pool.
Just a thought.
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On Thu, 11 Aug 2011 16:34:04 -0700 (PDT), gwandsh wrote:

The irrigation is just for the grass. There are no consumables (other than a few orange and olive trees scattered about).
The only problem is that there is absolutely zero precipitation. Of course, the chaparall grows fine on the fog in the morning - but there won't be a single drop of rain for ten months ... so ... not much in a 'yard' would grow sans sprinklers.
I did, for now, turn 'off' the irrigation. I will also drastically lower it. Maybe once or twice a week instead of ever other day.
Also, I found a leaky hose (but I can't imagine it leaked a thousand gallons) which I removed.
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On 8/11/2011 7:34 PM, gwandsh wrote:

I'll second that.
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SF Man wrote:

That Rain Bird model 1800 uses .1 gpm/ head http://store.rainbird.com/product/detail/A18796-M.aspx
200 sprinklers @ .1 gpm = 20gpm 20 gpm * 20 min. = 400 gallons per watering 15 waterings/month = 6000 gallons
Not the best use of 6000 gallons/mo. of H2O during a drought. You're (were) watering enough for a whole household to use for 'normal' use.
I hope you're not running 3 pool pumps all day long in the sun. What a huge waste of electricity.
Since you obviously have the means, why not take this "problem" and turn it around into a eco-friendly solution? Nobody said you have to give up anything, I'm asking if you'll re-think the "big-picture".
You have an abundance of sunlight, but a shortage of water. Turn the sunlight into water. ROI for solar panels is still about 20 years, but it's not always about the $$.
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How does one turn sunlight into water with solar panels? Or anything else in a residential desert environment for that matter?
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

By selling electricity back to the grid, and use the savings to drill a deeper well!
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On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 08:24:05 -0500, G. Morgan wrote:

Ah. That idea went deeper than I at first imagined!
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On Fri, 12 Aug 2011 08:06:07 -0500, G. Morgan wrote:

Thanks for that calculation! I have the sprinklers off, at the moment, and, I think I'll drastically change the cycle in the ten months when it doesn't rain.

I don't have solar yet (although most of the neighbors do). We have more sun than we know what to do with. It's sunny from 6am to 9pm at the height of the summer. Rarely is it a cloudy day. The fog comes in at night and dissipates by 10 am when it's around.
Only two of the pool pumps are constantly running during the day. It's useless to run them at night because of the solar heating panels (they'd be solar cooling panels at night). So, they have to run during the day. One pump is for the fancy cleaning system; and the other pump is for the filter. Both must run at the same time (2.2 horsepower each). They run about 15 hours a day. I really have no choice in that matter, unfortunately, except to put up about 50K dollars and go solar with about 15 KW of panels.

Exactly. More sun than I know what do to with; and not enough water to do much with!

Huh? How?

I calculated the ROI was about 7 years since we're paying about 50 cents per KW hour for the last two weeks (or so) of the month (it starts at 12 cents per KW hour for the first week or so).
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SF Man wrote:

I was thinking if your 'plant' is big enough you can sell electrons back to the power company, plus the savings you could put the $$ towards a new well.

7 years! That's a no-brainier if you plan to live there longer than that. Then you'll be "off-grid" if need be, and have a trusty new water well too. If your capacity is high enough, you'll have an income stream with Edison Electric selling *them* energy.
I pay .14/KWh no matter how much I use (I'm on the Texas grid).
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