Manual vacuum?

I've got a small pond (800 gallons) that needs to be cleaned out. I won't get into it, but I want to use a garden hose to drain the pond. Isn't there some sort of gizmo that can be attached to a hose to create a pretty healthy vacuum? Where can I get one? Thanks.
Dale
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from running water. Used to be commonly available at K-Mart, Wally World, etc., if you could find someone who knew where they were stocked. You'd want a pretty good screen over than intake to keep 'er from clogging up 'tho.
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Just submerge the garden hose until it is full with water, or fill it from a hose bib. Leave one end of the hose in your pond, close the other end with your palm or a plastic shut-off and lower it to the drainage area so that the hose-end is below the water level in the pool. It will drain the pool. (no sucking necessary)
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Walter
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Dale wrote:

It's called a "pump". ;-) Probably a dirty-water pump, although you could use a clear-water pump if you have a good strainer on the suction tube.
I would just use a siphon if possible and let it run for a long time.
Best regards, Bob
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I knew it was a pump ;-) but I thought there was a crank-like siphon that could be attached at the end of the hose to get a really good vacuum going. As it is, I'm draining about a gallon a week. Maybe I just need to go and rent a sump pump.

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exist, but ya gotta ask). Most pumps get downright cranky if there is a lot of gunk in the water.
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Dale wrote:

The driving potential is the height differential between the upper and lower ends...the initial pressure drop is immaterial to subsequent flow rate. The problem is a garden hose is such small diameter you're losing it all in friction losses, most likely.
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Dale wrote:

Pool cover pumps can do 800 gallons in 1 or 2 hours. (The pumps are rated for GPH.)
They're reasonalby cheap and resist clogging.
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I should have mentioned, they are designed to work with your garden hose.
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zxcvbob wrote:

What makes you think his pond is at a higher elevation that where he wants the water to go?
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Dale wrote:

Many septic suckers actually just hook up a bypass valve to the manifold vacuum of their truck. Simple, cheap, effective...
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Drill-pump. Attaches to your hand drill. At most hardware stores.
YOu'll probably want a bungie cord or clamp the keep the trigger pulled, it will take forever.
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Dale wrote:

Yes but you'll run 8000 gallons (minimum) to drain the 800 gallons out and only if you have a very load elevation change. Even one of those little pump gizmos (about $10) to put on a drill would more much better. (Forget this idea.)
What you need is a pump, a real pump, maybe a sump pump would be the way to go.
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Depends on the pond. If it's one of those plastic lines ornamental ponds, a "real" pump may pull enough water to damage it.
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For a siphon to work, the discharge end of the hose must be lower than the intake end. If you can arrange that, just fill a hose with water, keep the discharge end sealed until you dunk the intake side into the pond, then open up the discharge end. (A hose sprayer can do the sealing for you.)
Dale wrote:

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Walter is correct
SIPHON IT
REAL men siphon, yuppie metrosexuals use pumps!
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around.
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WalMart has a bilge - live bait tank (12 volt DC) pump for $20. Garden hose size. Works great.
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