Major Score

Page 1 of 2  

My dad passed away in 1998. He loved power tools. Today I was going through the attic and found an almost new Craftsman 315.276040 3 HP Electronic Plunge Router. It was purchased new in 1992 for $215.00 Now I'm going to have to go through everything to see what's there.
Now I need to learn how to use it. Question: Is it possible to use a plunge router in a router table? I really like the 3HP size of the motor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In principle yes, altho you might have to modify the base to attach to the table. Note, tho, that 3 Sears HP = 1 Porter Cable HP. No foolin.... Sears used locked-rotor current (stalled motor current) to calc their hp -- a total scam.
--
EA



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 5 Jan 2010 00:45:01 -0500, "Existential Angst"

Cites, please.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK, my bad: 3 Sears hp = 1.1 Porter Cable hp.
Sears motor rating policy is common knowledge. You can verify this for yourself with an ampprobe -- lock the spindle with a vise grip, or wood in circular saw blade, or whatever, and measure the current. Multiply by 120, then divide by 746. Wahlah -- their hp rating.
Now, take same circ saw, wail on a 4x4 until you "feel" that it is counterproductive to push harder, measure the current, calc as above. That would be the "real" hp rating, proly 1/3 the above locked rotor current, mebbe even 1/10.
Do the same for a Porter Cable.
iirc, the FTC or some equivalent org made Sears suposedly stop this practice, a few years ago.
Sears is no cute li'l retail bunny. After they were caught in NYS in their auto repair ripoff scam, they were sued in mebbe a dozen other states, coast to coast. google sears auto repair lawsuit. Unfortly, google dudn't reveal much on their motor rating scam, but who would expect less of Sears?
--
EA




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 5 Jan 2010 07:27:42 -0500, "Existential Angst"

In other words, you pulled this accusation directly out of your ass.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote in

Just some doc I found. Maybe good bickering material :-)
http://www.powertoolinstitute.com/pti_pdfs/HorsepowerProc.pdf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Should send Sears a copy.
--
EA



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 05 Jan 2010 06:16:56 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

How many REAL 3hp electric motors have you seen that run on 120Volts???
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ashton Crusher wrote:

The only thing I question is the statement that the 3 hp Sears is the same as the 1 hp Porter Cable. Yes, they do use the locked rotor method, but they all do. Many companies offer a 3 hp router. Does anyhone think you'd have a real 3 hp motor in your hands like that? Look here for hte ratings of some http://www.woodcraft.com/Category/1002158/Routers.aspx
When you get into table saws, the better brands use real numbers. Most are 1.5 to 32 hp, but Sers is something like 4.5 on their little saws.
Notice the high end 3 hp saws http://www.woodcraft.com/Category/1001210/Saws.aspx
Notice that Sears no longer gives HP ratings. This u sed to be 4.5 hp. Now it is 13A. http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00921802000P?mv=rr
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 06 Jan 2010 05:58:53 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Yes, seems to be a marketing trick (the same way that hard disk manufacturers lie about the capacities of their drives). Once one company starts doing it, they all do as otherwise their product seems inferior.
Thankfully the power's only part of what makes for a good product, I suppose, and there are always places like this group where folk can ask what the best buy for a particular price range is...

I've never quite understood the point of using current draw as a marketing tool - I mean, 13A might imply a powerful motor, but it might also mean a shit motor and lots of friction in whatever mechanism the motor is connected to. It seems pretty meaningless (other than to know whether it's going to melt your wiring or trip breakers ;-)
cheers
Jules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I recently got a book "Woodworking with the Router", Bill Hylton. He says "The industry standard is to report peak horsepower on a universal motor, ... and continuous horsepower on an induction motor, the type used in stationary power tools." It makes some sense. Induction motors are more often used for long periods at their rated HP. Universal motors (brush type) often are used for very short periods. You can use the peak HP of a drill for a short time. I believe he is talking about HP that is measured as HP, not as derived from current.
--
bud--




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good points.
--
EA

>
> --
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, I corrected that to 1.1 porter cable hps.... :)
But seriously, that part was "said for effect", altho it could might well be true.... I'll post more on this later. I can't imagine a responsible company using the locked-rotor method, tho.
But, brush motors can get very powerful in small sizes. iirc, you have these little bitty table top race cars with motors the size of a AAA cell, that are a good fraction -- perhaps the better fraction -- of a hp! Due to supermagnets.
Whether you would WANT a true 3 hp in a hand-held router -- or if yer 15 A breaker could take it -- is another story.
However, be careful -- that ignerint asshole Salty Dog is going to ask you for cite after cite, and accuse you of making all this up if you can't deliver.
--
EA.


Yes, they do use the locked rotor method, but
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

What applies to the Sears router also applies to the Porter Cable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/5/2010 12:45 AM, Existential Angst wrote:

I understand that different manufacturers can rate things differently, but this router weighs twice as much as my 1 HP router. It's almost too heavy to handle.
It has a knob sticking up for plunge dept adjustment. It has a very fine thread on it. Since I have not used it, I don't how accurate it will be, but it should do fine for my hacking.
I probably would not have purchased a 3HP (or whatever) router for my presently minimal needs, but it will be great to have a second router that uses 1/2" bits, plus I won't have to change bits as often when I'm using both routers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mcp6453 wrote:

The only problem with plunge routers is that it can be tricky to control the depth with a fine degree of control.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ever see the Tim Allen plunge router episode?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Red Green wrote:

Oh I probably did, that was a long time ago though. <G>
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yea a long time ago :-(
IIRC he plunged it on a countertop or something and it just went everywhere and dragged him with it. Might have been the same episode (well, maybe not) where he turbo charged the dishwasher in the island and it blew a huge hole out of the back like a military round.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The plunge mechanism is controlled by a couple of springs trapped in the plunge mechanism. It is not too big a deal to remove the springs if you want to mount the router in a table. The trick then becomes how to "dial in" a specific bit height. You may be better off saving your pennies for one of those Triton (made in Australia?) routers that come with the "above the table" bit height crank knob. There are also good plans online for bit height adjusters that are basically a chunk of all-thread and a plywood disc.
Make sure to invest in some hearing protection... routers really scream.
The best router table I have ever had was a replacement wing for my table saw... I can use the table saw fence for the router, and I save a whole bunch of space in my shop. The wing was kind of pricey, but then again so is buying/building a good standalone router table.
Get yourself a good book on routers, or visit the library and check out a couple. Keep a good grip while using it, they are deceptively dangerous.
Best of luck!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.