low water flow to kitchen

Hello All - This morning I noticed the water flow to the kitchen sink was very slow. This evening, it is still slow, and it is slow to the dishwasher too (supplied by the same lines). Flow is low for hot AND cold. The kitchen lines are the farthest from our water main, but these lines (and most in the house) are relatively new since the kitchen was done three years ago with new plumbing and we put new lines in the rest of the house this summer. All the other fixtrues in the house have great water supply. The main water valve is on, all the cut-off valves seem OK and there aren't any leaks as far as we cana tell.
We checked the aerator in the faucet - looks fine. We tried shutting off the supply valve and turning it on - all we did was make the flow worse. What gives? We've just about finished a bathroom remodeling project, but I think this is coincidental. Maybe not? Could we have a stubborn air bubble? I hope someone has an idea. Guess I'll have to call a plumber, but your thoughts are welcome. Thanks. Laura
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If you closed the supply/shutoff valve and then re-opened it and flow got WORSE, that kind of makes me wonder whats's going on inside that valve. No?
Raddion
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Did you actually turn on the faucets with the aerator taken off?
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The same thing occurred to me here, and it's always kinda amusing how a lot of us go thru a lot of rigamarole when it's often just the simplest little thang that should've been looked at first -- kinda like calling the TV repairman first when the first thing you shalda done was check to see whether the set was plugged in. Those miniscule water-mineral particles gumming up those itty-bitty little faucet screens can be a bitch, even when you think you don't see 'em.
AJS

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Ya, I agree .... for the 1st time in 31 years, I had to have the buffalo box shut off to replace a broken main valve .... of course, on Sunday. However, the water company was less than a mile away fixing a main break, so they came pretty fast. After I replaced the valve, they came back and turned on the water at the buffalo box. The water in the basement tub started running immediately for about 3 or 4 seconds and them stopped dead .... not even a drop! Turned out to be the aerator was completely clogged.
AJScott wrote:

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Rascalsmom wrote:

Since you state that the dishy has low flow as well as the faucet, it has to be something more than a clogged aerator screen.
Opening and closing the supply valve(s) made it *worse*. That may be a big clue. Shut off the main supply (drain the piping too) and then remove the stems from the kitchen supply valves. You may find obvious "gunk" (technical term) inside or you may have to turn the water back on and flush the system thru the open valve body (suitable precautions...)
Jim
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My opinion is the shutoff valve on this line is bad. If it is a washer type valve then the washer is probably in pieces plugging the valve. Shut off the main, and disassemble the valve after draining. When opening the main, open a couple faucets just slightly to bleed off any trapped air.
Dave
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David Babcock wrote:

Hi, Veggie spray head on the sink? This can cause it too. (the diverter valve) Tony

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We had a similar problem with low flow in our kitchen sink. Our sink has one of those single water outlet thingys with a hose that pulls out and a sprayer on the nozzle.
Once every couple of weeks, my wife calls in a wrecking crew of unbelievably destructive Hispanic ladies, any one of whom could single-handedly destroy the working parts of a brick. These honeys had somehow managed to put a severe kink in the hose.
Being basically lazy, I figured that the price of a house call plus inflated costs on parts would be a good investment. I called in those zany guys over at ARS Residential Services. Their "plumbing specialist" gave me a repair estimate that involved replacing everything under the sink, including the goosenecks. Total bill was to be something like $600. WHOA!!!!!!!!!! Now we're talking serious beer money. This inspired me to get off my lazy ass, find a parts dealer, pick up a hose (for around $35.), and devote about 20 minutes squirming around under the sink.
Given my druthers, I would rather have spent the time watching tapes of Anna Nicole Smith, but this was more fiscally prudent.
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