Lighting question - new house

I am beginning my electrical design on my new house, to be started in the spring,and would like some input on where it would be appropriate to put different types of lighting. For example, I know that I will be putting surface mount fluorescents in all closets and in my home office, but not sure about other areas.
Right now, my existing home was retrofitted with a large number of recessed cans in the kitchen and dining room, as well as one basement room. While the light levels seem to be fine, switching on 10 - 100 watt incandescent bulbs in the kitchen seems to be a huge electricity hog. What can I do in the new house to get the same daylight spectrum and light levels without sacrificing a week's pay each month (it seems) just to have that? I also have tracklighting with some small halogens in my office, and while the light is "warm", it is not without many shadows. It's tough to work after dark in there.
Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.
--
Jon Endres
Reply To: wmengineer (at) adelphia (dot) net
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Jon Endres, PE wrote:

<SNIP>
Check local code enforcement on kitchen lighting; energy conserving (i.e. fluorescent) lights may be required as the primary illum. source.
Jim
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Incandesants output 17 lumen per watt. CFL 40 to 60 but T 8 flouresent up to 105 lumen per watt almost 10 times more than incandesant . there are dimmers that go to 10 or 20 % and sylvania has a good selection of colors. You should contact Sylvania, GE and Phillips to see what they offer.
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message

recessed
When I remodeled my kitchen I put in recessed cans, I use compact fluorescents, and there are daylight bulbs available(google). The CFL's are 28 watt and put out like a 100 watt bulb. Granted they never last as long as they say and they do turn yellowish towards the end of their life. I am purchasing them at Costco for like 4 bucks a piece. Ikea had some a while back that were like 2800 k, looked yellow next to almost everything, really cheap. I also used indirect lighting fluorescents, 4-8 footers mounted on the tops of the cabinets and shining up. They work great. I like indirect light so not a problem. Biggest issue that I know is no shadows on the counters in the kitchen.
I put my lights on two switches. One switch for each side. Works well and you can burn what ya need and not any more. I usually use the lights above where I am working and not the other side. Winter time both switches are used.
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I suggest a mix of incandescent and florescent lights. With the new compact florescent lights you may be able to use the same fixtures. The mix should give you the natural color of the food you are looking for.
You may also want to use other florescent lights with some of the new more natural color lamps. They are not all that bad. A real step up from the old cool white lamps.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Install undercabinet flourescent strips - the professional models are 1/2" thick. Wire them all to a wall switch at each kitchen entrance. Consider them the primary light source. They're the best task lighting and reduce, often eliminate the need for overehead lighting at all, except for asthetic purposes. You may want 1 over a sink or desk that can operate independantly.
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Jon Endres wrote:

It seems as if you've answered many of your own questions. You at least know what you *don't* like. Consider where light is critical and make it so. I have a central ceiling fixture (fluorescent) in my kitchen, and will definitely opt for some under-cabinet lighting the next go-round. When I work at any of the counter/stove/sink areas, I put them in shade (never mind how much) from the overhead light. OTOH, the overhead in the computer pantry is just right. Instead of having all lights turned on by one or 2 switches, you might prefer more localized on/off options. The further away a light is, the more shadows are going to be thrown. If you want consistent light around your office worksurface, mount it low and close. The concept "lamp" comes to mind -- either desk or standing.
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Jon, I have close to 100 Lightolier track light fixtures in one of my homes and both my wife and I are quite disappointed with them. They are fine for lighting art or specific objects but not for area lighting.
Boden, PE
Jon Endres, PE wrote:

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We have found that for lights that will be left on for long periods of time (not just on then off in a few minutes) the compact fluorescent lights work very well. We use them in the living room lamps and elsewhere and have noticed a drop in the electricity consumption.
You might want to look into LED's also. The initial cost is high but the savings are great.
--
Ron
Port Dover Ontario
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