LED Light Bulbs now cheaper than Incandescent

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I was almost shocked yesterday when I went to Walmart to buy some of those new halogen-incandescent light bulbs, to put in my outdoor porch light fixture. (CFL bulbs dont work outdoors in cold weather).
A pack of halogen incan... bulbs was around $6. A TWO pack of 60W (equivalant) 8.5W actual, was $4.60. (Great Value brand)
A year ago, ONE LED bulb cost $15 to $20 or more.....
Needless to say, I bought the LEDs.
Now I can afford to begin replacing all the CFL bulbs in my home with LED bulbs.
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On 8/22/2015 1:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I bought some two-packs of Philips 60W for $4.99 many months back. But, have only installed them in a few locations (e.g., garage door opener) as most of the lights, here, are dimmable floods (the dimmable LED's still aren't quite as nice as the incandescents).
We're waiting to see how *reliable* they'll prove to be. A ~$2 bulb that doesn't last long is still an expensive bulb! OTOH, the CFL's were essentially "free" so even poor quality would make them affordable (if you ignore the impact on the environment)
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On Saturday, August 22, 2015 at 4:29:44 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

At $2 even if it lasts just a couple years, it will have paid for itself in electricity savings. I had those concerns when they cost $25, but now, not so much.
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On 8/22/2015 2:05 PM, trader_4 wrote:

A colleague "gifted" us a carton of 100 equivalent watt spots (the sort with the giant heat sink). They've remained packed away in the case out in the garage simply because all of our fixtures are on dimmers.
We've tried a set of four 65 equivalent watt floods in the family room. They don't dim anywhere near as nicely as the incandescents (though 1000 times better than the dimmable CFL's!). We'll see how they hold up. Color temperature is a big issue, here (think "art")
[With 130V incandescent floods, we can turn the dimmers to their lowest settings and effectively have "whole house night lights"... too dim to realize they are *on* -- unless you wake up in the middle of the night and try to wander around (e.g., house guests) in which case they are *perfect*]
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On 8/22/2015 4:29 PM, Don Y wrote:

Don't wait until the sun burns out to try them Get two to put in the two lamps you use the most and make your own decision. So far, they seem to be very reliable. Affordable now too.
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On 08/22/2015 03:09 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

When CFL's started gaining popularity, my electric coop sent everyone a free box of assorted CFLs. This time around they're only sending 2 free LEDs and a low flow shower head, so I'll be able to try them.
The only thing I've noticed about CFLs is they are slow to start in the winter but I've gotten used to turning a light on and having a pause before there's any light.
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<stuff snipped>

That's precisely why I've been yanking all the CFL's out and replacing them with LEDs. You'd be surprised at how quickly you re-adjust to the damn light coming on to full brightness when you flick the switch.
Almost all of the CFL 23W bulbs I got from HomeDepot (N:vision) take a full minute to reach max brightness and start out at what I'd called 50% or more dimmed. Not acceptable if only for safety reasons.
And no more stinking mercury going into the aquifers from CFLs not being properly recycled. I suspect scientists will see huge mercury spikes in sediment layers that clearly mark man's flirtation with CFLs. They may only have trace amounts of Hg in them, but they've made billions of them.
As an additional bonus, a broken LED doesn't warrant a hazmat spill response (hyperbole alert!).
--
Bobby G.



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On 08/22/2015 10:47 PM, Robert Green wrote:

When I was a kid and school desks still had a groove for pencils (to say nothing of the hole for inkwells) I had a little bottle of mercury collected from old mercury switches. I'd amuse myself by pouring a little into the groove and pushing the blobs back and forth. As far as I can tell the worst effect was the outcome of the 'keeps busy at worthwhile activities' entry on the report card.
Back in the '70s the company I worked for did contract assembly for Sylvania, both grow lights and 4' energy saving tubes. The EPA definitely doesn't need to know how the broken bulbs and non-starters were handled... Of course, every factory and office in the world was disposing of all those 40w T12's safely. Then suddenly every CFL became a lethal device ready to kill your children and pets.
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On 8/22/2015 11:11 PM, rbowman wrote:

Sure! And we used to have fluoroscopes in the shoe stores, used DDT around the house to kill unwanted critters, dump the used oil from our car engines in the storm sewers, etc.
One of the local universities has periodic auctions of surplus equipment. Often some good deals to be had.
But, the catch is you have to take what you bought! So, that nice pallet of computers might have a 5 pound jar of mercury hidden in a box amongst it all.
Great way to deal with YOUR hazardous waste: make it someone *else's*! *AND*, make them fight for the right to PAY you for it! :>
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In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 22 Aug 2015 23:21:19 -0700, Don Y

I can still see my feet glowing. Where there is no nightlight, I take off my slippers and use my footlights to guide the way.

The last one is really bad.

LOL. Did you hear that they've solved the traffic problem for New York City. They made all the streets one-way west. Now it's New Jersey's problem.
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<stuff snipped>

Reminds me of the parody of LOTR by the Lampoon called "Bored of the Rings." They described a mythical ringed city with 9 huge concentric walls. The royalty lived in the centermost ring. Garbage was routinely tossed over the wall to the surrounding rings until it reached the outermost, poorest ring where the inhabitants ate whatever came over the wall. Same principle.
(-;
--
Bobby G.




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I used to watch Storage Wars and I wondered how many times they've cut open lockers to find either dead people or meth labs.
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Bobby G.



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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 23 Aug 2015 00:11:33 -0600, rbowman

That was the short-term outcome. You'd probably speak 7 languages by now were it not for that.
When I was 6 or 7 my father, a dentist, brought me home a bottle of mercury, about 3 large thimbles-full. I still have it, 60+ years later, but I haven't found too many things to do with it. I was going to use it to refuribish mercury switches for car alarms, but so far, I've just been transferring good mercury switches from one car to the next.
I played with some when I was little but don't remember details. But I now it's the reason I haven't won a Nobel prize.

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micky wrote:

My brother had a small glass container with mercury... circa 1962. I helped him polish silver coins with it. He kept those blue books with 'slots' for every nickel, dime, quarter minted. It shined the hell outta those coins too! As far as I recall, that's all we ever did with it.
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On 08/23/2015 04:41 AM, micky wrote:

I do speak seven languages; nobody understands five of them but what the hell.

Repairs over the decades have replaced it all with composite or crowns but I spent a good deal of my life with a mouthful of mercury amalgam. The mercury was inert and never leached out of the amalgam; honest.
Then there is all the fish I eat. The pike have enough mercury you could nail them to the barn door and use them for a thermometer.
Oh, and I chewed the lead paint off the brightly colored beads on my stroller.
don't misunderstand; I sort of a tree hugger and support cleaning up the environment but there's also an inordinate level of panic and paranoia used to nudge the sheep in the desired direction.
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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 23 Aug 2015 12:13:48 -0600, rbowman

Lead paint is a real issue. Other than that I agree with you.

And it goes the other way too. In maryland the director of housing for the state suggested that mothes would feed lead weights to their chilren to raise the lead level in their blood so they could get a a money judgement from landlords. I don't think any of the mothers had thought of this, partly because I dont' think it woud work.
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<stuff snipped>

I just read an article about how many people in Baltimore (including recently "bounced to death in a police van" Freddy Gray) received huge settlements (half mil) for being exposed to lead-based paints.
The interesting thrust of the article was about how there are firms that specialize in "cashing in" those settlements for people in a lump sum. That can be as low as $20K for a $500K settlement. And people TAKE those sort of deals.
One law firm is now claiming if they were so addled by lead paint, they couldn't enter into those contracts with competence. I would have to agree: taking $20K when you'd be entitled to lifetime annuity payments totalling $500K pretty much shows defacto incompetence.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/how-companies- make-millions-off-lead-poisoned-poor-blacks/2015/08/25/7460c1de- 0d8c-11e5-9726-49d6fa26a8c6_story.html?tid=pm_pop_b
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On 08/27/2015 12:00 PM, Robert Green wrote:

There's the time value of money. of course that assumes you use the money in hand now for more productive investments than suitcases of Colt 45.
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On 8/23/2015 2:11 AM, rbowman wrote:

One time I dropped a CFL in my parents bathroom, trying to change the over head light. It broke, of course. I was going to sweep it up with a dust pan, Mom got there first with the vacuum cleaner. I quipped to my Dad that all that air flow over the mercury bulb, we're all going to die.
Well, about six months later, he died.
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I had a bottle of it - weighed a few pounds. Enough to float small, improbable objects on it. Good for shining pennies as Lowrider reports, pushed my finger in it a lot and my kids are perfectly non-existent. (-:
I believe the real issue is that when it's vaporized and inhaled (not sure if breathing the white phospor dust does it) it's pretty nasty. So never stand under a CFL that's about to fail with your mouth open.

They know. I read a study about the spread of mercury and they concluded that it ends up mostly in the very bottoms of waste trucks and in the sumps of waste transfer stations. Then it gets into the water and works its way up to the top predator. What I remember most about mercury is Minimata and those disturbing photographs. I am quite glad that CFL's probably won't be around much longer because LED bulbs are almost always going to be cheaper to make - no mazes of twisty glass spiral, all alike. (Remember Adventure?)

No doubt whatsoever. In the trailer for "Black Mass" about Whitey Bolger he says: "If nobody saw it, it didn't happen." I know in NY and NJ that principle governs much of the waste industry. Even my dog lives by the same principle.

Well, the press has to whip up a frenzy about everything. It's clearly high on their list of job priorities.
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