Leaky Compression Sillcocks for Washing Machine. Any reason not to solder on Sillcocks?

Yesterday my tenants had a new washing machine delivered. The sillcocks were leaking after they were turned off and back on the installer tried to fix them but couldn't. So the tenant went and bought new ones but could not get the compression sleeve off the pipe. I went over and then I bought a compression sleeve puller at Lowe's <http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?partNumber0988-943-03875>. I removed the old sleeves, cleaned the pipes with 00 steel wool, and put on the new sillcocks with new sleeves.
They leak. Maybe one drop every 30 seconds.
So I was thinking of soldering on sillcocks instead, i.e. <http://www.zoro.com/i/G4072695/?categoryr10 . Is there some reason that this is a bad idea? Why wouldn't a builder do this in the first place?
Or is there some way to keep the compression sleeve sillcocks from leaking?
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On Sunday, June 1, 2014 9:26:24 AM UTC-4, sms wrote:

You could solder them in. Or just use regular threaded plumbing connections. That's what I would do. You can still change them that way by just unscrewing, if necessary.
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SMS,
Compression fittings are stanfard for that use because the tight space makes soldering difficult. If you are comfortable with soldering these pipes then go ahead. Ferrules can be mistakingly installed backwards. The bevel is different on each side of the ring. The longer bevel should face away from the compression nut.
Dave M.
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install ball valves, they appear to last forever:) At least I have NEVER had one fail.
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wrote:

Soldered on works better, but you need to know what you are doing to make a good joint - and avoid melting the seals in the faucet. Best method is to get thread-on faucets and salder a threaded adapter to the copper pipes, then thread on the new faucet with thread sealer on the threads (teflon tape or pipe dope) Then they are easy to replace later.
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On 6/1/2014 12:59 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

around the valve in the area where the valve seats are. In a traditional turn type valve, I usually make sure the valve is not off or not completely on.
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wrote:

threaded, or "sharkbite"
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No, there's no reason NOT to solder the supply valves on to the water supply piping to a washing machine.
I have 3 washing machines in my building and all of the water supply shut off valves are soldered into place. And, I have ball valves up stream of those water shut off valves so that I can service the shut off valves without shutting off the water to all three washing machines, and those ball valves are soldered in too.
--
nestork

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'Oren[_2_ Wrote:

I usually do what Oren's suggesting... take the cartridge out of the valve so that there's nothing that can burn.
But, always take a look at the bonnet nut. If it has EIGHT sides, that usually means the bonnet nut was tightened up at the factory and the valve is not meant to be taken apart. In that case, the best way to take it apart is to put the eight sided bonnet nut in a vise, put a folded up rag over the valve body and use a large pipe wrench to unscrew the valve body from the eight sided bonnet nut.
Then, go to any place that sells O-rings, and buy a TEFLON BACK UP RING to serve as a gasket between the eight sided bonnet nut and the valve body. Teflon back-up rings are expensive, so expect to pay about $3 to $4 each for them. But, they work exceedingly well as gaskets.
--
nestork

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sms posted for all of us...
And I know how to SNIP

I never knew they sold these as being used to remove the ferrules. No matter what you do they gotta go and the pipe will be distorted and have to be cut. Use whatever you feel comfortable with. Definitely install ball valves as shut offs. They leaving the washing machine for you when they bug out?
--
Tekkie

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