Lead Poisoning

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During the "Big Dig" project in Boston, Massachucetts, USA, they uncovered many pieces of old city water pipes that were made from hollow tree trunks. These were still in use, and maybe over 200 years old.
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My house was built in 1952. Some of the pipes I've replaced were either lead or galvanized steel. All of the cast iron drain pipes have lead pounded into the joints. It must be how they used to do stuff.
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The joints were filled with oakum, a rope like material and then molten lead was poured around it.
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it gets worse, much of the solder used to join copper pipe in plumbing had lead in it until it was banned in the 1980s
many humans should be more concerned about dieing from stuff in their homes than dieing from terrorism,,,lead poisoning,,,copper poisoning,,,cadmium poisoning from galvanized pipe,,,,carcinogenic fiberglass dust,,,etc. etc. etc.,,,,
consider having your drinking water tested by a lab...
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effi wrote: ...

...
While possible, most of those sources are strongly overrated as to their effectiveness as exposure mechanims. Solder is in the joint and on the outside of the pipe, for example, not in the flow stream except in quite small quantities that flow during the soldering. Etc, etc., ...
Don't get me wrong, I'm not say to go out there and see how much melted lead vapor you can manage to inhale, but come on now...
And, I am aware that pure lead as the Romans used for potable water ain't a good idea, but I'm still doubtful that that is what was used for the lateral spoken of in this thread...I suspect a lead alloy which probably has much less of a leaching problem than pure lead.
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Duane Bozarth wrote:
...

And Speedy Jim educated me that it was lined...obvious solution on retrospect.
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you excluded from your quote of my text the most important line i wrote
it reads "consider having your drinking water tested by a lab..."
as to solder effecting drinking water, see: http://www.extension.umn.edu/info-u/environment/BD303.html which also says "The only way to know for sure if your water contains lead is to have it tested."
this is splitting hairs, but a person's or family's health (especially young children) is well worth splitting hairs for
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effi wrote: ...

...
If you'd started w/ that or just posted that, I'd have let if fly and never responed--that I wouldn't disagree w/ When you start off w/ a "the sky is falling" mantra, that I just can't abide... :)
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I have seen no evidence to suggest that there are people dropping dead in the street from the causes you mention. Everytning is deadly if you take enough of it . None of us get out of this life alive.
Get over it!
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PLONK !
"Avery" <> wrote in message

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The lead caulking in cast-iron pipe-joints probably never even gets wet. It's only there to hold the oakum in place.
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On Wed, 19 Jan 2005 13:02:47 -0600, Duane Bozarth

Lead pipes from the utility to the house bring potable water into most of the houses in my neighborhood -- including my 1921 house. It's the original pipe. We're located in an urban suburb near New York City, so we're certainly not in the boonies. Of course, the building code wouldn't allow such a pipe today.
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Tom Miller wrote: ...

As noted in another response, I never lived in an urban area until much later so that was a new one for me...learned something I didn't know which was the point of asking...I'm going to ask the City Engineer here if it was commonly used here...so far, everything I've seen in town has used black or galvanized. Of course, there's very little in town here that predates 1900 as the original townsite wasn't founded until about 1888 when this became the railroad terminus prior to opening the OK Territory...
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On Thu, 20 Jan 2005 10:25:36 -0600, Duane Bozarth

Then this town is actually younger than yours, founded in 1895, population 811. However, the first European-style dwelling in what became the town boundaries was built in 1704. Prior to that, there was a large Lenape Indian settlement here.
The big development era was from 1920 to 1930 when the population increased by 300%. That was when most of the houses were built and I would guess that all of them originally had lead intake pipes like mine. The water company puts chemicals in the system to help keep lead from leaching. And judging from the relatively low water pressure I've lived with for 23 years, the inside of the pipe must be pretty well coated. Two toilet flushes in the morning clear the pipes of the water that has stood in the lead pipe overnight.
Only two adults live here and we drink bottled water almost exclusively (by preference, not fear of lead poisoning). We have no children. We use filtered water for coffee, again out of preference.
We tested for lead years ago and have discussed the issue with the water company. The water company regularly sends information, including the results of testing, to homeowners on this and other purity issues. I've read a number of articles and research documents. Frankly, I'm convinced that my brain is safe from lead poisoning. On the other hand, it does not seem to be safe from being 63 years old.
I think if I had little kids (shudder) I might replace the pipe just to be double sure.
I actually have the lead intake pipe "insured" with a replacement program provided by the water company and keep hoping it will someday break and need their "free" replacement. No sign of anything yet, however.
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Tom Miller wrote: ...

...
That would be a slightly different fashion of "founded", though I think...there were settlers around for quite some time, they just got around to actually organizing the town later would be the way that sounds.
In our case, there weren't any dwellings in the area about a 30 mile radius) other than a few dugouts much before the railroad chose the particular route (bypassing several other either existing or speculator-platted townsites) which ended up here. Then, essentially overnight, all of the former county seat moved to the new terminus and a town of about 3000 came into being in about six months. Little rough 'round the edges for a while, but that's yeat another story... :)
The Cimarron cut-off of the Sante Fe Trail did pass about 20 miles northwest of town but that was about the only route of any real organized travel in the area prior to the railroad laying tracks. Dodge City and the other cattle terminal locations are still another 60 to 100 miles further east and north on the old Santa Fe lines...this was the Rock Island. Will Rogers made his first cattle drive as a youngster right after leaving home from a ranch down in the TX panhandle across the OK panhandle to the new western lots.
I'll post one last note when I find out about lead laterals...
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I lived in a small town in Pennsylvania in the early sixties. During that time they repaved the street & redid the water & sewer mains. The pipes from the water main to individual houses were lead pipe.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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I've got a lead drain on my kitchen sink, still.
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OMG !!!!! You are going to poison the guys down at the sewer treatment plant.
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