Laying Keystone blocks - how to handle curve (upper levels)?

I'd appreciate some help on my Keystone block garden wall. It's going to be 3 courses high. I laid a good foundation course and now am starting the second course. I discovered that on the curves, because the Keystones are setback, they get progressively offcenter as you go around the curve. It creates an "extra length"
How do I account for the "extra length" on the second course curve for the setback Keystone blocks, so i can get all the blocks centered over the lower seam?
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Dave




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You could lay the second course from the middle of the easily-seen curves, outwards. Then cut or trim where they meet between the curves. Or just don't get hung up on the issue, and tolerate the mismatches.
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Airkings wrote:

Cut the block. Only way to do it.
R
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Airkings wrote:

For only 3 courses and unless the curves are really sharp I can't see that the offsets are going to be enough to matter. The joints won't line up vertically by will be offest on a slant somewhat but if you start from the same end each time, that slant will remain constant and thus part of 'design'.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

Actually, the offset will change as the change in chord length due to the block setback is cumulative.
R
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