Lav sink: what is the stopper value called?

Hi All,
Under my Lav sinks, there is a ~4" pipe that has a valve or some such on it. It attaches to the pull up on the faucet that stops up the sink.
What is this valve called?
And, does it usually come with a replacement sink?
Many thanks, -T
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T wrote:

Are you saying that the sinks wind up draining into a 4" diameter pipe and that there is a valve on that pipe? If so, I have never heard of such, let alone seen it.
Normal is a 1 1/4 or 1 1/2 tail piece from drain into the "P" trap which goes into a larger pipe (2"?) sticking through the wall.
New sinks commonly come with the drain, not the rest.
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wrote:

Very few come with the drain. Most come with nothing and the faucets have a matching drain assembly with them. My laundry tub did have a drain, bathroom vanities, no.
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On 6/26/16 12:24 AM, T wrote:

You mean one of these:
http://www.lowes.com/pd/Keeney-Mfg-Co-Universal-Fit-Chrome-Pop-Up-Drain-Kit/1059287
It is usually part of a complete matching faucet and drain kit, not included in a replacement sink.
Also comes as a repair part, as in the link above.
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On 06/26/2016 04:46 AM, Retired wrote:

Yup. That is it. And the official name is Pop Up Drain Kit.
And, it should come with the replacement faucet, not the replacement sink.
Thank you!
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On 06/26/2016 03:52 PM, T wrote:

Current one is about 25 years old (this is a "contractor's house", meaning nothing is done well). I presume it would be a good idea to change it with the sink?
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Maybe sometimes, but there was little wrong with my house.
(I ended up belonging to the same community org. that a guy my age who helped build my house belonged to. I think it was just a summer job he got because his uncle's company did the financing for the whole project, and he had a lot more money than I, and by the time I met him, 4 years after buying that 3br house when it was only 4 years old, he was living in one twice as big.)

On one of my 3 bathroom sinks, the chrome on that part is bad, and it might be hard to separate from the sink, and if a gasket is used??, you might have to make your own, but other than that, I don't think they often wear out. When they get loose, I think they can be tightened by tightening that nut, which is something I should try on one of mine (My house is 37 years old now. I don't think these little problems reflect on the original construction. There WERE two things they did wrong.
They didn't let the dirt in front of the house settle enough, (or make it settle??) and so the stoop/patio slab in front of it, and the other 15 townhouses next to mine, and the other 20 2 blocks away in another n'hood built by the same company, have all sunk), at least 4 inches. I've taken 4 12-inch pavers to make a step. Others have done other things. The electric company must have noticed because a few years ago, they came buy and lowered all the meters since the wire getting taut. But this, I think and I'll check, only affected the houses at the bottom of the hill, which might have been built on landfill, although I thought the landfill was only at the rear of the house.)
And 2) they did something badly about the bathtub drain in several houses. I've been in 7 of my n'bors houses and 3 of them iirc had had the dining room ceiling patched, because the tub is right over that.
In my house too, the water drippend down the chandelier chain and filled the frosted glass bowl around the bulb, so that if you looked you could see an inch or two of water in it. I emptied the water but it filled again. Never got high enough to break the bulb. It only happened when my brother visited and took a shower. I took baths and it didn't drip then. But after 3 or 4 years, it stopped dripping evne when my brother took showers and I figure that the sloughed off skin and dirt and soap from his showers plugged the leak. I've never had to patch the ceiling, all of the water came down through the chandelier electric box, and it doesn't leak anymore.
3) and they didn't put enough insulation in the attic, though the first owner put in a lot more.
4) and at the start, they didn't even put in a wall in the attic between houses. I think that's illegal and the building inspector made them put them in after the fact, and later houses were built properly.
5) I don't count this but you might. The windows are low-priced, I guess. The window and storm window slide separately, so it's a small nuisance to open or close. And after 37 years, a couple of the fuzzy strips have come off, which could let cold air half-way in, though if it actually comes in, I don't think so.
Okay, 4, not 2 things. I think those were the only things they did wrong and they did a lot of things right.
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My girlfriend when I first got here had a custom built house. They started with one of several designs but could adjust the size of the rooms etc. It was 50% or more bigger than mine, on a bigger more expensive lot in a more expensive n'hood, and cost twice as much ,and boy did she have problems. She was married when they had it built, and she (mistakenly) thinks that's the reason her marriage failed. Every day after work they would go check on the progress and "every day" they would find something wrong with it, and her husband was always bothered and she never was.
Two stories he told me: It took (parts of?) two days to put the ceramic tile in the front hall and in the middle of this, the guy with the quarter round (and baseboard?) showed up and where the tile was, he put that just above the tile, and where the tile wasn't, just the subfloor, he put that just above the subfloor!!!! They redid it.
And the powder rrom just off that front hall had a toilet and a sink that faced each other. They put the door in so it opened in, so when inside, you couldn't get to the toilet because the door was in the way, and you couldn't close the door because you were in the way!!!! They redid that too but maybe only because the husband complained.
And I noticed that it had brass colored doorknobs on both sides of the bathroom doors. That might be common but our house built in 1952 had brass colored on the outside and chrome colored on the inside, to match the plumbing fixtures. I think that's better and they had thought of it 30 years earlier but didn't use it.
On Mon, 27 Jun 2016 07:25:08 -0400, Micky

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You mean 4" long, not 4" in diameter.

Yes. It's registered in the Office of Names.
I can't help it. I'm feeling sarcastic this morning.

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