Laminate is bubbling


Hello everyone,
My family moved into a house that was newly renovated about 1 and a half years ago. Then, there was a new laminate throughout the entire house. Now, in the bathroom, the bottom scrapes on the laminate, when opening the door
The bathroom is a humid place... I am wondering what options I have for fixing it other than ripping out the floor... Any ideas?
Also is laminate a good choice for a bathroom? What has worked better for others?
Thank-you for your input.
Regards, Stephen
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Hello everyone,
My family moved into a house that was newly renovated about 1 and a half years ago. Then, there was a new laminate throughout the entire house. Now, in the bathroom, the bottom scrapes on the laminate, when opening the door
The bathroom is a humid place... I am wondering what options I have for fixing it other than ripping out the floor... Any ideas?
Also is laminate a good choice for a bathroom? What has worked better for others?
Thank-you for your input.
Regards, Stephen
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Nope, I can't think of anything.

Vinyl flooring works really well but a lot of people don't like it for various reasons. Very durable and relatively inexpensive.
Another option is tile -- natural stone, ceramic or whatever. Very durable but potentially quite costly.
If you want something warmer, I really like good quality carpet tiles -- but only those rated for damp/wet conditions. Fairly durable, moderate cost. Keep some spare tiles and you can likely replace any that do get damaged.
--
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| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

No.
There are a lot of different laminates and some do OK in the bathroom. Most don't. Those that do OK only do OK if properly installed.
I additions to the suggestions made by Malcom, I would add rubber tile. Soft warm durable and water does not bother it.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Good point. There's cork too. Some folks seem to like it but I have no personal experience with it.
--
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Malcolm Hoar wrote:

I put cork in my library and love it there. I used a laminate version. I would not use the same type in a bath as the laminate I used was not rated for potential moisture.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Thanks everyone for your feedback. This has been excellent.
wrote:

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On 24 Feb 2007 10:09:37 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The bottom of what?

What is the floor being scraped by?

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Trim the door.

None. It may be cheap laminate. Reploace it with good stuff or other material.

In many cases not a good choice. Some, I think Mannington, does say it is water resistant. I'd use ceramic tile or vinyl flooring.
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My elderly parents have had Mannington click laminate in 2 bathrooms and kitchen for over 3 years now. It was properly installed using silicone at edges under wall moldings as called for by Mannington for wet areas. I am sure they are not careful with water on floor from dripping after baths and showers. Manningtion laminate still looks brand new.
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Before you do that, inspect the hinge side and top edge of the door. Is it sagging, thus scraping the floor in a way it did not 18 months ago. Using screws 1/2-inch longer than the originals may offer at least a temporary solution, or you may insert a shim behind the lower hinge(s).
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On Feb 24, 1:09 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

buy rugs? lay a wooden yardstick across the bottom rubbing area, mark door, remove door, go outdoors, trim the bottom off the door for a one-inch clearance over your new machine washable rubber backed rugs. this will allow replacement air to enter and carry the hot humid shower air out your ceiling exhaust or window exhaust. or if there is a forced air heat register the air can circulate out under the door.
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