Laminate Flooring Installation Questions

Hi Everyone,
I purchased my laminate flooring on Tuesday (June 3rd). I am aware of the 'wait 48 hours' rule and the flooring is still in the boxes in the room that it will be installed in. I plan to start Friday or Saturday.
My concerns are....
1) I live in Toronto and the temps have been in the 20 degree Celsius range since i bought the flooring. On Friday the temps are supposed to go up to about 32 Celsius. There is rain in the forecast as well (I am already feeling an increase in the humidity .. it will probably get worse by the weekend). Having said this, should I now wait a little longer (I have been told to avoid installing laminate in high humidity), or can I proceed with the insallation on Saturday (temps are expcected to drop to the mid to low 20s by Monday)?
I of course will leave my 1/2" gaps around all the walls, etc.
The flooring is 10mm QuickStyle AutoClic (purchased at Rona)
2) QuickStyle recommends using their underlayments. I was speaking to a gentleman that works in the Rona flooring department and he said that I don't necessarily have to buy the QuickStyle flooring. He suggested I buy a Rona branded 4 in 1 product (this would be the same as a 3 in 1 but with some added bumps or something that aids in covering up minor floor imperfections). This product seems a little thicker than the QuickStyle underlay. Would this be a problem? Should I return it and just stick to the QuickStyle recommendations and get theirs (it seemed a little thinner)?
Thank you, Laz
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Laz wrote:

I recently did a couple of rooms. As a test, I put a sliver of the stuff in a glass of water for a month. It expanded a minuscule amount. I suspect the problem of distortion is unimportant.
You'll also need a rubber hammer. You'd be ahead to get yourself one of these:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber416
The hardest part was getting the pieces to lock together on the short ends.
A cheap table saw makes the job so much easier (some board will have to be ripped).
You'll be tickled when the job is done.
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This concern should be directed to the your laminate factory.

The laminates I used recommended more like 1/4".

Often the laminate warranty will be voided when their underlayment is not used. Your floor should be flat and imperfections addressed before installation, regardless how thick you underlayment is.
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On Jun 6, 7:34 am, <Frank> wrote:

Regarding concern about the weather a few days before installing, I doubt that's an issue. If it was, a lot of installers would be idled during a rain storm or similar increase in humidity. I think the intent of letting the material sit for a week or so is in case it had come from a much more severe environment than it would typically see in a house environment.
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If you were putting in wood, there may be a tiny concern. Laminate is not going to be affected by rain as it is a pretty solid plastic, not wood. If you are trying to put off doing the job, your wife will probably buy the rain as an excuse, but the rest of us won't.

Should work OK. I'd use whichever is the cheaper.
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