Kitchen faucet losing pressure

We have kitchen faucet that is the farthest one from the water entry point in the house. It always has seemed to have a little lower pressure than several others we have in the house, but recently the flow in this one has dropped drastically. I was wondering if this might be due to something wrong with mixing device in the faucet and whether it needs to be replaced.
The faucet is a Kohler single hole mounting, single lever type with a pull out spray head. The mixing cartridge is a plastic assembly with 2 O-rings on the bottom. I can see 2 little springs inside, but the assembly doesn't look like it was meant to be taken apart so I couldn't check for obstructions inside.
Is it likely that just replacing the cartridge will fix it? I've seen them at Home Depot and Lowes. Or should I be looking somewhere else for the cause.
Suggestions would be appreciated.
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replaced.
doesn't
them
There's probably a screen in the nozzle. Have you checked to see if it's clogged?
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gib wrote:

There can sometimes be screens in the inlet pipes, also. Disconnect the flex there and check. You can also check your water pressure at that point. Use a bucket. If there's pressure and nothing in the screens then pull the cartridge. Actually looks like you already did that. Check the pressure with the cartridge out. Put the bucket over the open faucet this time. Good, replace the cartridge. Bad, look for inlet screens. Richard
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to determine how successful you are, write down how many seconds does it take to get a gallon of hot? cold? warm?
you could open up the fixture and flush out the fixture, flush out the debris in stop valves below by opening and closing them with the water running thru them.
here's a trick i used once: if debris is blocking the sink hot, block the sink aerator, close supply to water heater, open hot at the basement washtub, open the fixture to full warm, and backflush the cold thru to basement washtub. no improvement? swap instructions and backflush other line. no improvement? find all valve stops between main and the problem sink. remove and replace debris inside and replace their broken and disintegrated rubber washers blocking the line. if you are still using old galvanized silver colored pipes, the reduction of the inside diameter causing a restriction in flow is a regular battle until replacement.
to determine how successful you were, write down how many seconds does it take to get a gallon of hot? cold? warm?
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buffalobill wrote:

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Wow - that method takes me back. I had a watersoftener spew its resin into the water lines. I used the technique that you describe to clear them...
buffalobill wrote:

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Thanks all for the suggestions. I decided to take the spray head apart. It was really full of junk, looked like ground up rubber washers. Surprising since there was a good screen at the end of the attached hose. Cleaned it out and we have lottsa pressure now.

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