Just HOW does one clean a paint brush?

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HerHusband wrote:

With most *LATEX* paints.
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dadiOH
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that is ironic. like 'distressed' finish, or faux finish, which I refer to as MUCK
Glidden paint is THICK and gooey and even Floetrol hasn't made it 'work' better. Remember the Dunne-Edwards paint didn't leave those brush lines using the SAME brush [before it was ruined by Glidden] Something new has been added to this Glidden painting experience. Now I'm getting allergic reactions to paint fumes from Glidden: nausea, exhaustion, and painful llymph nodes under arm pits. To me, that's pretty significant reaction. Only instant rest and hydrating seems to stop the reaction. Sadly hydrating and resting are opposite.
At least, I don't have to clean the brush out anymore, just hang it in water and change the water a few times, then use the brush again seems to work ok. Only problem with that is the brush can't really be used above your head. The watery stuff runs down the handle.
Dunne-Edwards paint allowed me to joint compound/paint. Then, upon discovering I didn't like how I did the skim coat or taping I could sand feather everything and paint again with invisible results. no lines or junctions showing from previous work. Haven't tried this with Glidden, but have a premonition [based upon experience with 'cheap' paint that historically did this to me] that Glidden will NOT allow me to rework these areas. I'll bet the junction lines end up showing. I'll test an area later and post results.
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Robert,

From "latex" paint? That's weird, it's usually odorless, or at least that lovely latex scent. Sounds like you need to add some ventilation to your work area (open windows, turn on fans, etc.).

That's why I do the overhead sling to force the water out of the bristles and any that is trapped up in the ferrule of the paint brush. Of couse, any paint, stain, or other finish will eventually run down the handle when you're painting overhead. The thicker paints are actually nicer when working overhead as it doesn't flow down so easily.

We painted our Living room with Glidden latex paint and I had no problems recoating with joint compound to fix a low spot. Once the paint was dry, I skimmed on some more joint compound with a 12" knife, then sanded it lightly to smooth and blend before repainting. We're going on 8+ years with no issues.
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com
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