joining wires without a junction box within a wall

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Greetings,
What is the best (cheapest/quickest?) NEC compliant way to join two wires within a wall that will NOT later be accessible without disturbing the building finish?
The current method I most often see utilized in past construction is to strip an area of insulation off of a wire without cutting it, twist another wire around this wire with many loops and finally apply electrical tape generously.
Thanks, William
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NEC compliant??
I think you are out of luck. Someone correct me if I am wrong but doesn't the NEC say any join between two wires must be within an approved and accessible j-box?
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Greetings,

Please find a counterexamples at: http://www.tessco.com/products/displayProductInfo.do?itemIdI700
and
http://www.jhlarson.com/new_items/IDA/99_idaconn.htm " The Underground™ connectors can be used without a junction box and in many cases eliminate the need for heat-shrink, resin packs or multi-piece corrosion kits. They're perfect for decorative landscape lighting, lawn sprinkler control systems, sump and well pump installations and many other direct burial applications. "
Hope this helps, William
PS: I don't know what the NEC says about using underground connectors NOT underground but the point is that the NEC doesn't require ALL connected wires to be in junction boxes. Perhaps I am SOL inside a wall.
Connectors which allow connections within masonry / concrete without a junction box might also be helpful.
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When I had a situation like that in my basement, I just joined the 2 cables in a double gang box and made an outlet. So if I ever need access to it I can.
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Specific to outdoors/underground applications. I guess the assumption is outside you can always dig up anything that gets screwed up.
Indoors however different story with respect to destruction of finished surfaces.
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That and dirt generally won't catch fire, unlike a stud wall.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

In addition, I have never seen a spark ignite dirt.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
  Click to see the full signature.
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" snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com" wrote:

Those aren't "counterexamples" at all of what you asked about.
The NEC <does> require all in-wall connections to be accessible and in a junction box accessible w/o having to mar the finish. What is allowed underground or external has no bearing on the question posed.
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Whatever the case, electrical tape has no business being used for anything except a temporary connection. To me, that means a connection you have to protect while you run out to the hardware store because you ran out of wire nuts. Or, even better, top quality crimp connectors. Yeah...I know. People have used electrical tape successfully. But, it's still a cob job.
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On 5 Aug 2005 10:20:25 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

You are correct.
Either rewire the whole thing, or place a junction box in the attic or basement with a new piece of wire from the box to your outlet or device. Use wirenuts to connect them together, not just tape. Tape is only allowed if you twist and solder, which is far too much hassle.
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

There is no code-compliant way to make an inaccessible join, by definition.
You can make the join in a single- or double-size outlet box (which is properly mounted at the wall surface, as if you were going to put an outlet there) and cover it with a blank rectangular cover, which you can then paint or paper to match the wall, or hang a picture over.
Or if the location makes sense for it, you could make the join in an octagonal box and mount a wall sconce fixture or an AC smoke alarm (though the latter would technically need to be on its own 14/3 circuit interconnected with other alarms in the house, I believe.) There are no "pretty" blank covers for octagonal boxes.
In any case the box needs to be bonded to the circuit's ground wire.

Yeah, we've all seen that, as well as switches and fixtures mounted in holes in the wall with no box. I don't think it was ever code for romex, and is the sign of shoddy work. I don't know if it was code in in knob-and-tube days.
Chip C
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

Definitely DO NOT just twist the wires together and wrap with a lot of tape!
I thought there was some connecter that was listed for use where it is inaccessible. Can't remember where I saw this or remember the manufacturer....
I tried a google search but didn't run across what I was thinking of. Anybody else know what I might be thinking of?
Ken
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Just curious, would/could this practice lead to a fire caused by inductive heating?
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Simply twisting together two or more 12 or 14 gauge solid wires does not guarantee a solid connection. Having the junction inside an accessible box assures the following:
- Room for a clamping device (e.g. wire nut) - Accessibility for future inspection or repair - In the event of a connection failure the likelihood of fire spreading outside the box is reduced
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On 5 Aug 2005 10:16:23 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com"

Sounds like a great place for a receptacle ;-)
There is a device used in the manufactured home industry that can be buried in a wall (the AMP Enerflex) but NFPA plugged up the hole in the code that allowed them to be used in a regular building. At one time AMP even referenced 1996 NEC 336-21, an article that makes it "hold your nose legal". Most inspectors would still have rejected it.
They do not make this reference in their instructions anymore. They only refer to modular homes now.
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I did a lot of remodeling and wiring in my house. I had to change a lot of existing circuits. I often used switched box, either metal or plastic with cover. Many times the switch box is inaccessible when I don't have way to connect two wires in assessable box. Inspector never told me anything about inaccessible boxes and I don't understand why they cannot be used. Otherwise I had to rip off entire house to get to the accessible box where one piece of wire starts.
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Sasha, If the box was hidden, the inspector probably didn't know it was there. By the way, the NEC was written by "The National Fire Protection Association". There is something in that name that makes me want to follow the code as closely as possible, so I can live as long as possibly. The life I save may be my own. (You may save your own too!) Not a good place to save money.
Stretch
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Sasha wrote:

A. Probably the inspector didn't say anything because he was unaware of what you did. Alternatively, he could have just been incompetent, but that's less likely.
B. The "why" is precisely because of the "in" in inaccessible. It then becomes not only a problem w/ destroying the finish wall in a house when there's a problem, it's a hide and seek game to find the location of the hidden box that has the loose connection in the even there is a problem--and trust me, there <will> be a problem of some sort at some point in time.
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Inspector did see all junction boxes. I never hid anything from him. I don't understand why junction box may become a problem. I have 55 years old house and wiwing was done so-so. However I didn't find any loose connection in any of the box. If wires are screwed properly using proper wire nuts I do not see why they may become loose or any other problem.
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Sasha wrote:

A. In short, stuff happens...
B. All I can say is I'm amazed any inspector would see junction boxes to be covered over permanently and let it pass...
C. Think about the poor schmuck who eventually ends up w/ this place and has no idea where this multitude of additional boxes are?
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