Is there a way to cut through concrete slab without making a mess?

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Is there a way to make sure it's not PT slab? It's a single story single family residence, probably unlikely to be PT?
MC
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miamicuse wrote:

I had my basement floor sawed. He sprayed the whole damn basement. WTF? he could have used a drop cloth or somethin. Eventually discovered the stuff was in the furnace and causing it to not function as well.
What a mess. And even after they use the saw, they will probably have to jack hammer a bit to get the concrete out anyway. And those clean cuts don't heal as well, at least in my case.
However, the cleanliness will depend on the quality/self-respect of the people you hire no doubt.
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CL Gilbert
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Make sure its that thick... If its only 4" you can do it all yourself.
Get a drill and verify the thickness. 8" thick, get someone else to go at it. 4" will only take a few hours and is a good workout.
I broke up my basement floor to put in sewer lines. Not a bad job.
If you want a real clean cut..... Use a circular saw with an abrasive blade (get two they are cheap)
Put up plastic liners around all the openings and open the window.
A nice fan will be ok in the window
Score it and cut a little bit in, This will give you a nice clean line.
Use a sledge hammer or something similar to break it up. If you want to make it even nices, drill holes all the way through in a sort of grid pattern. When you break it up, the cracks will form from those lines.
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miamicuse wrote:

Think later. After the job you have a repaired sewer line and, above it, some dirt and a 3x3x1' plug of concrete.
What keeps the plug from settling?
I'd tunnel. Small children work cheap.
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Well, initially I was going to tunnel, but then many suggested tunneling may compromise the foundation and footing, so now I am thinking fixing it from above, but if it will create a mud pond and damage my cabinets, I did not consider the issue of settling, are you saying the weight will crack the new PVC pipe? Can I not put sand and compact it before I pour concrete? I don't know how deep the pipe is though... is this a real concern?
MC

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yes. you can get hand wet saws. makita makes one. you hold up a wet/dry near the cut to remove the water, but you get no dust at all.
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeIdi70&productId 0304717&R 0304717&storeIdi70&langId=%2D1&cm_ven=Paid%2520Inclusion&cm_cat=Performics&cm_pla=Froogle&cm_ite=Froogle
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-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1
On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 13:41:05 -0700, "Charles Spitzer"

Cutting up a congrete slab with one of those would be like roasting a 20 pound turkey over bunsen burner.
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iQA/AwUBQumjhAIk7T39FC4ZEQIxuwCdHMRnnz+x8JCWVQxX47IiQlZsET0AoOih Y/dsEsjUgPiFGLvTyXn00dWW =5njL -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
--
-john
wide-open at throttle dot info
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On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 22:29:38 -0400, "miamicuse"

You never yet said what is wrong with the sewer????
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here is information on different type of sawing
The Wire cutting is something that COULD be really good for your application if they can drill a hole in 2 places and get the wire threaded it will be cutting from the bottom this will meal all the dust and mess will be in the hole rather than the kitchen.
Normally when cutting concrete the "wet" method is used where there is a steady stream of water on the blade this provides cooling lubrication and debris removal. You should be able to have plastic put down on all of the surfaces and the doorways were well as above depending on the working room they may be able to tent the work area one of the big things 2 is air pressure.if they reduce the air pressure with a fan running outside in the work area the dust will not be able to get very far.
Ask to speak to people who have had the company make holes in their houses to get an idea of the mess
http://www.cuttingtechnologies.com/cutting-coring.html#2
CTI pioneered the use of the diamond cutting techniques shown below. While each has its own unique advantages, all share an ability to provide fast, clean and non-destructive removal of virtually any construction material. If your project requires surgical precision, a cost-effective alternative, or innovative engineering in sensitive environments, CTI's cutting and coring techniques are your only choice.
DIAMOND WIRE SAWING
A motorized system of drive and guide wheels pulls a diamond-encrusted wire around - and ultimately through - the object being cut. To cut voids from a larger structure, pilot holes are first drilled into the structure at the ends of each cutting plane. The wire is then fed through the holes to create the loop that will sever the spoils from the remaining form.
Typical Materials Cut:
Heavily-reinforced concrete, solid stainless steel and rock.
Cut Sizes:
Limitless dimensions and volume.
Typical Cutting Applications:
Crossovers in extremely thick structures.
Demolition of mass-concrete forms such as dams, towers, piers and nuclear facilities.
Cutting of structures under water or otherwise inaccessible.
Cutting of fixtures with complex, irregular shapes.
Advantages:
Precise cuts with no over-cutting at corners and smooth finished surfaces.
Lack of vibration, noise, dust and flying debris enables "clean" demolition in sensitive and occupied areas.
Controlled cutting leaves remaining structures safely intact.
Quick, versatile, safe and economical alternative to conventional demolition.
BLADE SAWING
Depending on the need, circular, diamond-tipped blades are mounted onto a range of power units - from walk-behind slab saws for cutting level surfaces, to track-mounted wall saws for cutting steep or vertical inclines, or even handheld units for smaller cuts.
Typical Materials Cut:
Steel-reinforced concrete, pre-cast concrete, asphalt, stone walls and cobblestone street beds.
Cut Sizes:
Up to 30" deep
Typical Cutting Applications:
Paved surfaces such as roads, runways and bridge decks.
Walls and suspended slabs such as floors and roofs.
Access-way breakthroughs for stairways, elevators, windows and doors.
Trenching and crossovers for mechanical services and cabling.
Advantages:
Precise cuts with smooth finished surfaces
Quick setup and sawing minimizes down time and traffic disruptions.
Variety of power sources to accommodate all available power and exhaust requirements.
Cutting in confined spaces.
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Wayne:
Thanks, I called about ten concrete contractors and most use the wet saw. Cannot find anyone who will do the wire cutting, and someone else suggested drilling holes at short interval then chisel out by hand may also minimize dust, can't find anyone to do that either. May be this is a too specialized and require some high tech contractors? Can't seem to find them if you know of a link to find such contractors please let me know. Thanks in advance,
MC
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On 7/27/2005 9:29 PM or thereabouts, miamicuse appears, somewhat unbelievably, to have opined:

I had a couple of leaks under the slab repaired in my previous home. My plumber brought a jackhammer and chopped out the hole needed himself in just a few minutes time. Of course, we're talking about holes that are somewhat smaller than your 36x36. I replaced the dirt, compacted it to the best of my ability, and poured ready mix in to patch up the holes. Then I replaced the broken ceramic tiles and grouted them. No problems at all after several years. One leak was in the kitchen and the other in the downstairs half bath.
--
As a child, my parents thought I was an idiot-savant.
Now, however, it is rather clear that I\'m simply an idiot.
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Dennis Turner wrote:

i had plumbers in my house yesterday. They used jackhammer. Again the jackhammer proves much cleaner than the saw.
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Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
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