is it ok to use alot of wirenuts in a subpanel.

I need to replace a subpanel and the old one is smaller than the new one. The old one is already maxed out with minis and has more than one circuit fed from one half of the mini (more than one wire under each screw). there is no more room in the closet for another subpanel. I purchased a bigger panel with more slots, but most of the wires are too short now to reach the new breaker slots. Can I just lengthen the wires using wirenuts to make them reach the new breakers legally? This is the only way I can think to do it without having a bunch of junction boxes up in the attic to feed the new panel.
Thanks
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Yes. Most likely the new subpanel has ample room compared to the old one.
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As long as there's enough space in the panel to make the splices neatly, it's Code-compliant.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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gore wrote:

panel in a closet you are required to move the panel out of the closet, because it does not meet code. The NEC requires a clear space in front of the panel.
Bill
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BillGill wrote:

That would depend on the exact layout with the closet, as a door in front of the panel is not counted as an obstruction. If you can open the closet door and look straight at the panel, it's probably fine.
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wrote:

It is still a NEC violation to have a panel in a clothes closet.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Cite?
The closest I can find is Article 230.70(2) which prohibits the service disconnecting means from being installed in a bathroom. An AHJ might interpret a clothes closet as not meeting the requirements of 230.70(1), but that is local interpretation, not a NEC violation.
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Pete C. wrote:

240.24 (D)
See the long discussion here: http://www.inspectorsjournal.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_IDg73
Jim
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Speedy Jim wrote:

Interesting, though the implication that clothing is easily ignitable isn't really true. Most clothing seems to be self extinguishing as I've found many times with welding slag, embers from charcoal, etc. Lots of little burn holes, but I've never gone up in flames or had to extinguish anything.
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