Is $100 per hour the going rate for engineers these days?

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Could you explain a little more about "site supervision"? I'm the owner and doing all the labor (except the big pours, etc) and fabrication myself. Do you mean the engineer will have to watch over my shoulder to see that the work is being done right?
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Since you're contemplating building the whole house yourself, you must be a pretty handy guy. The fact that you haven't dealt with engineers means you're probably not in the business and may or may not be up on construction techniques. If that's the case, you should have someone "keeping you honest". There are sequencing and other concerns that aren't necessarily obvious to even a skilled craftsman who hasn't built a house.
The supervision doesn't have to be the engineer. It could be a builder with experience in commercial & residential construction since yours will be a hybrid.
R
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It doesn't sound out of line to me, but maybe you could go to night school and learn structural engineering. You might be able to save some money. Then again, it might be more expensive.

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It takes much more than just knowledge of engineering. IIRC you can't seal drawings in this state until you have a degree, X years of work experience in the field, then some other engineer to vouch for you.
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Gee, when you consider all that, maybe you did get a good rate. Even for NC. What do you think?

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You sound just a little sarcastic but that's OK. Everyone so far agrees with you that the rate is OK. Again, I've never done this before. I have to be very careful since I'm unemployed and drawing out of a nest egg.
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Do you have a logical reason for "building a house that employs a lot of commercial techniques"? Is this going to have to meet some kind of L&I code for a home business?

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No, it's just a small residence. I had the opportunity to design my dream house several years ago and this is what I came up with. I wanted the qualities of strength, security and longevity with minimal maintenance and I didn't find that in traditional wood residences. Everything is about the surface --looking like something better than it really is. It is OK if the thing disintegrates in 5 years, it will give the 2nd owner something to do.
I am by no means wealthy. I love building and working by myself. I figured by doing most the labor myself I could offset the extra cost of better materials and techniques.
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You can build a super quality house with conventional home building methods. You don't have to use commercial techniques and spend $9K on engineering. For that kind of money you can hire a good contractor to do and show you how to do a lot of things.

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Ah, but where's the fun in that? One of my criteria was to use no wood --at least for structrual purposes. This is all masonry, concrete and steel. When I say I've never done this before I'm just talking about the engineering. I'm plenty handy --both metal and wood.
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They don't use wood, use concrete. Check out www.integraspec.com www.polysteel.com www.standardicf.com Saves a bundle on energy, strong enough for a tornado (except the roof, but the structure will stand) and very quiet inside. May options for exterior finishes that will last for years.
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It may be out of line. Around here, $150 is more likely.

You got one, IMO.
I know plumbers and service technicians that get $100 an hour. That is very reasonable for an engineer. Don't think all that money is going into his pocket. Lots of costs involved in operating an engineering or any professional business. Out of that $100 comes secretaries, office staff, rent, heat, insurance, etc.
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On 28 Jan 2006 07:47:51 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Well back in the late 80's I worked for a structural engineer in a small outfit and he charged $75/hour then so I'd guess the going rate is more like $125 to $150/hour today. BTW, that was in Texas.
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Tom wrote:

Indeed. Many firms have to pay not only for engineers and their building, but for extremely expensive software that can run tens of thousands of dollars per seat, per program, each year.
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