Installing a Vainty - Wains Coating...

Figure my ignorance.. but I truly know nothing when it comes to home repair.
Here's the situation.
I bought a new (older) home. Its about 50 years old and prior to us moving in some work was done on our behalf.
The room in question is a small powder room. Wains Coating and hardwood floors have been installed.
A custom vanity was ordered and needs to be installed.
I was thinking it may not be hard to attempt this myself.. but.. figured I'd ask for advice.
Can the vanity be screwed into the wains coating? Is that enough, or does one need to find the studs behind the wall?
Any general advice.. or website that may contain a step by step checklist that would cover the wains coating/hardwood floor configuration?
Thanks much.. in advance...
Regards,
Paul jules77
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Jules77 wrote:

Find the studs and screw into them. Usually the vanity has a nailing board towards the top of the cabinet.

Is there a vanity there now? What are you doing for a counter top and can you hook up the plumbing and drain????? If you have no knowledge of this kind of construction you might want to contact a Handy Man.
Rich
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The old vanity was removed, the plumbing and drain are in place so I assume a flexible line for the plumbing and some sort of PVC to the drain, never done before... but I assume I can figure it out? The counter top was ordered with the new vanity, its drilled to accomdate a 4 inc center faucet that we got on ebay.
thanks..
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The old vanity was removed, the plumbing and drain are in place so I assume a flexible line for the plumbing and some sort of PVC to the drain, never done before... but I assume I can figure it out? The counter top was ordered with the new vanity, its drilled to accomdate a 4 inc center faucet that we got on ebay.
thanks..
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This might be considerably more complex than it appears at first glance. What is the relationship between the vanity (I presume it's wood) the wainscoting and the flooring? Is the whole of the vanity including the top within the wainscoting itself? Usually there's a chair rail on top of the wainscoting; is it all below that? Is the floor where you're going to put the vanity at exactly 90 degrees to the wainscoting? And of course is the base of the vanity at exactly 90 degrees to the back?
What I'm driving at is that normally these measurements are not 90 degrees and normally the backs are not 100% even and normally the wainscoting isn't flat either. There's a distinct art to shimming the vanity (like installing kitchen cabinets) and scribing the back of the vanity sides to follow the contours of the wall/wainscoting. If you want a great-looking job and you haven't done it yourself before, you might want to let someone with experience do the work.
OTOH if you're prepared to live with the gaps or cover them with molding or they won't be seen go right ahead.
As to screwing it in, don't forget that all the weight is going to be on the floor. You only need to stop the vanity moving around. If the wainscoting is thin (5/16 or less) it's normally installed on furring strips mounted horizontally on the studs. If the nailing strip at the back of the vanity lines up with the furring strip (s) screwing through the wainscoting into the strips should provide sufficient support. OTOH if you have nice expensive wainscoting made from (say) recycled 3/4 quarter-sawn oak, just screw into the wainscoting. Or if you have cheap-jack plastic imitation wainscoting you might just continue the theme and use construction adhesive <g>.
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