Install single lever washing machine valve?

After reading that Washing machine hoses, etc are statistically the biggest cause of flooding, I would like to prevent this.
I currently have a standard washing machine wall box with 2 standard multi-turn boiler water valves. I would like to retrofit a single lever dual-valve shutoff in place of the 2 standard valves.
The house is about 10 years old, but I have no idea if the valves are threaded or soldered in place. I'd have to rip out the drywall around the Washer box to either hold the nut to unscrew the old valves or to be able to unsolder the old valves.
1.) Is this a good idea?
2.) Could a plumber do all this including cutting out the drywall, etc?
3.) What about a no-construction jackleg sort of solution which would be 2 hosepipe-to-1/2"-adapters so that the dual-valve would be installed outside the boiler valves?
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Overkill, IMO.

Almost any plumber will be happy to hack some holes in your drywall. Very few can/will make good afterwards ;-)

Just buy and fit some really good quality hoses (e.g. with stainless steel braided sheath). Inspect regularly.
Alternatively, if you really want another electronic gizmo, consider something like this:
http://www.plumbingsupply.com/washingmachineshutoffvalve.html
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I have a single handle washing machine shutoff I installed 25 years ago and were I to do it over I would just use 2 ball valves. Cheaper and allows you to do a very hot wash by turning of the cold water for things like dyeing.
Get good quality hoses-the ones with stainless braid are less prone to bursting. valves?
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Jeffery Jones wrote:

Definitely a good idea to install one, but are you sure that you can train all the machine users to remember to shut the valve off when they are done using the machine? And what happens if a hose decides to blow from the water hammer when a washing machine solenoid valve closes, and no one is right there keeping an eye on things?
You might want to consider using an automatic water detecting shut off valve set like this one:
http://tinyurl.com/naqj9
Using one of those systems takes care of the issues I raised, plus you won't have to do any wall ripping or soldering either.
And, if you want to be really anal about it, you can push the "OFF" button on the controller when the laundry is done. <G>
HTH,
Jeff
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will a floood do damage? with washer in basement on concrete floor who cares.
with washer on 3rd floor WORRY.
do install properly a auto off valve, and for extra protection a washer catch pan with drain line somew where like a washtub......
minimizes leaks and they cant do serious damage.
few people will remember to use every time even a single lever valve:)
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You don't store stuff in your basement? If the flood water gets wicked up by any drywall there will probably be mold growth - on both sides of the drywall.
R
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Jeffery Jones wrote:

Replace the rubber hoses with metal hoses (like you use to hook up a water heater).
No sense in a $500.00 solution when a $5 one will suffice.
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On Sat, 23 Sep 2006 20:47:30 GMT, Jeffery Jones

I've seen these valves. I think the idea is to make it easy for home owner to flick on the valves to wash, and flick off when moving the clothes to the dryer. I think many insurance companies would be happy to see these in homes.

You will have to talk with a plumber. Get all steps in detail, including clean up. Dont' assume they clean, since you are paying them a high price to use your vaccum.

later,
tom @ www.CarFleaMarket.com
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Jeffery Jones wrote:

Installing a single control valve won't prevent anything. You need to turn valves off each time you finish using the washing machine. If you can't do it now with two valves, you won't be able to do it with 1 valve.
If you really want to prevent possible flooding you need to install solenoid controlled valves that are normally shut and only open when the washing machine operates. The solenoids probably needs to be controlled by circuit of the main timer/main control.
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

I don't know how you were raised, but it is much easier to turn off one valve with a touch of the finger than it is to turn off 2 valves taking several stiff rotations.
I just installed a dual toggle valve and, while I don't always remember to turn it off, I do the majority of the time.
Bill Gill
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On Sun, 24 Sep 2006 04:32:36 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

You're right in that it only prevents catastrophies that would have occured while not washing and only if I remember to turn it off. A battery operated alarm connected to the laundry room door closure and valve would be a simple failsafe reminder.
I'd be much more likely to turn off a single lever valve (2 seconds flip VS 60 seconds of cranking). Also, in my limited experience, frequent rotary boiler valve operation can result in valve seal failures due to overtightening, etc.

I have just found an electronic cutoff valve (watts) controlled by the washer so it'd be simple. It also comes with a moisture sensor. And an adapter kit is available for a dual boiler valve box. Total list price about $270 --- probably less than a full plumber retrofit of the dual valve cutoff.
However, it seems to be a case of nearly too complicated for a protection device, and could easily to fail within an estimated 20 year lifetime. It requires a surge protector, however an external surge protector would not protect against a voltage spike between the water pipes and power line - a likely condition in a lightning strike.
This could require talking the wife through how to bypass the device if it is hit by lighning while out of town.
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actually not true. most failures are burst hoses. minimizing time they are pressurized by auto valve should help prevent a disaster all the time.... less wear on hoses
deally a electric valve that turns water off when washer isnt in use PLUS turns water off at any time if a leak is detected.
Your concern appears to be a auto valve damaged by a power surge.....
add surge protection to your main breaker cabinet and make certain everything is well grounded.
a serious power surge can cause way more damage than being unable to do laundry, most folks have a ew days worth of extra clothes, time enough if your out of town for a plumber visit...... or laundrymat. or phone directions for wife
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