In ground water pipe?

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Thinking about plumbing a water pipe from the entry source into the house to my irrigation control station so as to eliminate water flow noise emanating from my attic copper plumbing when the irrigation is on. What piping material would be appropriate for direct in-ground installation that could reliably handle constant water pressure like the copper piping does in the house. Corrosion over the years to the piping in contact with soil is also a consideration of mine. I just guessing but would that eliminate copper from consideration? Would galvanized pipe be the choice? I would like that piping to be safe to drink out of also. Any suggestion would be appreciated. The search for "water pipe" in this forum did not give anything specific to the in-ground application I am considering. By the way, the soil in my patch of California is mostly grey clay. Thanks in advance.
Manny
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trg-s338 wrote:

Virtually any service these days is plastic -- either rigid or flex, doesn't really matter.
Copper not good for underground and too expensive, anyway. Galvanized second choice but again is pretty expensive these days and will eventually corrode (altho not likely in a time frame you'll care) but the hands-down winner for ease and cost is plastic.
--
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dpb wrote:

A few months back we had a slight leak right where the main supply pipe come through the basement wall and into the meter. Called the plumber -- who had to call the municipality and get the water turned off at the curb -- and found out that the pipe was plastic -- polyethylene? They replaced about six feet of it with copper.
Perce
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

That's interesting. Do you mean buried within the earth? Some soils (sadly at the moment I can't recall what types can cause rapid pitting of copper pipes). I recall visiting a large housing estate some 25 years ago where there was a high unaccounted loss of water on the distribution system. The whole estate (about 10 years old) had been serviced by copper pipework which was riddled with pinhole corrosion of the copper. The complete estate had to be resupplied - with polypipe though I cannot recall the type of plastic now.
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Clot wrote:

Yes, buried within the earth. Somewhat sandy soil, but I have no idea of the pH.
Perce
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Underlying rock?
I have a feeling that the issue that I was referring to relates to high iron content clays that can react with copper - but I could be wrong.
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Same here. Neighbors line was leaking and they dug up the plastic line and replaced it with copper. A few years ago the water company got so tired of fixing leaks from plastic on some local streets that they worked there way down those streets where all of the lines had been replaced with plastic after a water main upgrade and replaced all of them with copper.
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Wonder! Some 35 years ago we plumbed water in from the municipal supply out in the street with 3/4 inch copper. About 100 feet. No problems AFIK. But if it ever did leak or whatever, is there any possibility one could push/pull a smaller diameter (probably plastic?) pipe through the 3/4 copper??? To avoid digging up all the way from the connection to the main to the house. The main shut off is about 20 feet inside house where copper pipe emerges from concrete floor. Water pressure is always good/high; all rest of the house is plumbed with half inch copper. All usual appliances, single bathroom. Hoping to never have trouble; but suggestions welcomed. BTW most shallow wells here seem to use buried plastic pipe; between the well and the home. With the pump usually located within the house.
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dpb wrote:

Not in my area. Plastic just doesn't do well with surges and high overnight pressures on gravity fed systems like ours. Plastic laterals are the number one water line failure problem around here. They replace them with copper.
You used to see rolls of plastic on all of the water company vehicles but that has not been the case for some time.

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trg-s338 wrote:

Why not MDPE pipe. Easier to lay and less liable to fracture over the years of settlement?
http://www.pipestock.com/mdpe-pipes-fittings-valves/
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Thanks for the suggestions thus far. I am not familiar with these new pipe materials but a quick search on your link shows they are a viable material for my application. Still slightly unnerved by plastic handling 65 psi constant and be reliable, especially at the solenoid controlled master valve it ends in. Any suggestion on this critical component in 3/4 inch?
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Scroll down to the Schedule 40 chart: http://www.harvel.com/tech-specs-pvc-pipe-40.asp
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trg-s338 wrote:

Here in the UK has been used for many years. There's miles of the stuff in the ground. Used by all the water companies as its burst/ leak occurences are far less than for alternatives.
My own service is laid in MDPE and apart from a fault at the stop tap in the street, which was common to many houses on the estate due to the faulty way they were laid, I've had no other problems in 28 years, (touches wood after having said that).
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I've been using Sch 40 PVC to supply my Sch 40 PVC sprinkler valve manifold for 29 years (at 65+ psi) ....no problems.
cheers Bob
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Poly pipe in a continuous roll. Great pressure, no underground connections. Fairly inexpensive.
I installed a service line for my grandparents in 1969 that is still in use. I also used the same for a yard hydrant in my own home in 1986. And I have another house that I purchased in 1986 that had the same stuff used for the service line in a very high pressure area of the city. No problems at any of those sites.
Colbyt
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PEX is the only way to go, cheap reliable non corroding, tolerates freezing pretty well
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trg-s338 wrote:

Copper or PVC are perfectly acceptable in ground materials.
s
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" Copper or PVC are perfectly acceptable in ground materials."

My 45 year old house has copper and not a single leak all these years. I am more comfortable with copper but was concerned with the possibility of corrosion if used in ground. Is this really an issue or am I overthinking it?
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in most area copper corrosion isnt a issue, age helps too, older copper lines appeared heavier.
although water companies now use PEX, if ground moves copper can crack, pex just moves
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Where are you located? Whether or not corrosion is a problem depends on you water & your soil condtions.
In my area of SoCal the building dept wants soft type K , no joints under ground or joints ok with silver solder.
I installed a type M mainline in 1980 or 1981 with soft solder joints under ground...no problems (so far).
If I had to redo the line....I'd use type K or PEX.
cheers Bob
I recently dug up the section near the house to make some changes. The 1980 copper showed some signs of corrosion but I'm sure it last at least another 20 years.
cheers
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