In-floor heating question

I'm planning on remodeling my upstairs kitchen and am contemplating putting in electric in-floor heating mat under my tile floor. Since my basement is finished, I don't have access to the underside of the subfloor to put any insulation to reflect the heat upwards into the kitchen. Is this going to be a problem since heat rises anyway?
Also any recommendations on manufacturer of heating mats? I would like to run it on a theromastat with a timer.
Robin
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Common insulation does not reflect heat (infrared). Foil coated foam does, and any other foil faced insulation. Your chosen system will have been engineered to perform effectively, so just install per instructions.
Joe
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On 1/10/2011 11:16 AM, rlz wrote:

Hot air rises. Heat flows to the colder location regardless of direction. You'll want the down R value to be greater than the up R value if you want to minimize heat lost downstairs.
Reflective insulation only works if it has space to reflect into. If it is in direct contact, it will not.
If you can add insulation under your "heat mat", do so. Even if it is just a bit.
Jeff
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Yup... If you are able to rip up the floors down to the bare plywood sub-flooring, then you should be able to cut into the sheet rock ceiling and patching it after you add the required insulation...
Doing it the right way the first time is cheaper in the long run rather than having to dig up the floor and replace the electric heating mat after it burns out from having to be activated longer and more frequently to maintain the temp at the thermostat without the proper insulation beneath the floor than it would if you did things right from the install...
Your house, your choice...
~~ Evan
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Reflection does not occur unless there is an air space. For optimum results at least 1/2 inch, but a couple mm will help.
Any insulation at all, will help cut radiation into the basement. Radiation does not occur unless there is appreciable temperature variation.
In my basement, I am installing 1/2 inch foam on the floor with 5/8 inch wood over it. The same could be done upstairs if the level change can be tolerated.
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Best go back and read that Physics 101 chapter again. IR radiation does not require air for transmission any more than light does. In fact, it is just a part of the spectrum. Radiation, convection, and conduction are all part of the energy confining solution. It pays to know which is which. Joe
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On 1/11/2011 3:44 PM, Joe wrote:

This is technically true, but the only space an average remodeler is likely to have is going to be air. Cosmonauts excluded, of course. ;-)
Jeff
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I put the kind were you attach the wires down the length of the floor.. I have it set to 85 degrees I comes on at 5am wife gets up at 5;30 floor cuts off at 7am whem she leaves for work. Just love a warm floor in the cold mornings.. This is in the bathroom If this is what your speaking of go to Warm Tiles Easy Heat see how it is done. I did mine all myself.. To break it in get her buck naked on the floor and have at.. Wear it out better do it before her boyfriend does..
.
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