I'm tired of paying for disasters... Moral Hazard.....

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16 million taxpayers live here, a few thousand them will get a FEMA check. If we can stop sending money to Washington they can stop sending the small fraction of it we get back. Florida is a "donor" state paying a lot more in federal taxes than we receive.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Greg) wrote in message

Everybody who pays taxes gets screwed over by this, except for the people who don't take responsibility and get enough insurance to cover their property.
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Larry Bud wrote:

How much is enough? Does it include motel expenses, lost wages (if my employer is out of biz)? In another day or two, I might prevail on the taxpayers of Georgia for use of their roads and shelters. Hope they don't mind :o)
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There are times we have to help others. Nothing wrong with hat be it tax dollars or donation.
There are times that people have to help themselves. Build a house five feet from the ocean, take care of it yourself. Everyone knows the ocean can flood or have storm surges that destroy property in a place like that. Don't ask me for any help when it happens, and it will happen.
Fortunately, new building codes are helping.
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There are still plenty of old houses that are built well. My 1963 house has a poured tie beam, doweled cells and straps (buried in the concrete) going over the trusses. Northern folks don't understand what they do when they build a house here. The reality is most of the "devastation" you see is trailers or houses with the (stapled) shingles ripped off. Of course there are houses built by northern builders who think they know all there is to know about building and the whole roof flies away.
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On 11 Sep 2004 03:25:35 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Greg) scribbled this interesting note:

Just to address the stapled shingles point you raise...
Here in the Dallas area we get plenty of big thunderstorms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, etc. I don't mean small summer breezes of thirty or forty miles an hour. In about thirty years of using Paslode staples and pneumatic guns we've only had a hand full of times when we have had to replace blown off shingles. One time in particular I remember when every house but one on a street that had a tornado pass close by. Every house but one required some kind of roof repair. The one was one we installed. With staples. The house next door, also one of our installations, did require some repair. The wind turbines were removed by the storm. Installed new turbines and a few shingles that were removed by the turbines and all was right again as the rest of that roof also had no damage.
It isn't the choice of roof fastener that is of primary importance. It is the installation. Used properly, roofing nails installed by hand, pneumatic coil nail guns, or pneumatic staple guns, each method will perform well if installed well. Of course any method of installing fasteners will fail if a bunch of slugs are doing the job... -- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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I don't think there is any staple that meets the current Florida code. It is 6 nails per shingle.
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Christ, that's almost a preforated edge. like your checks!
I don't think shingles blow off a house because they weren't properly fastened. If the wind is strong enough to get under the shingle, it's only a matter of mechanics that the shingle will break off and blow away.
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On 11 Sep 2004 17:07:06 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (HA HA Budys Here) scribbled this interesting note:

When installers are being paid by the square, one way to make more money is to go faster. How does the installer go faster? Fewer fasteners per shingle.
Another factor is installer laziness. Badly placed fasteners or poorly maintained equipment also are sources for problems.
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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John Willis wrote:

Our condo has mansards with flat roof between. Formerly concrete tile. Got elk laminated shingles, installed January. Lots were improperly nailed, and fell off. City changed installation/inspection requirements after our roof problems occurred. Now require glue under each tab on steep sections. Looks like crap. I don't know what cities typically do for in-process inspections, but they sure didn't look at the nailing. Roofer had expired license, according to the city paperwork. These shingles are laminated, with only half-inch overlap, so nailing 1/4" off the line makes a big difference.
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scribbled this interesting note:

I seem to recall you mentioning this a while back. Yes, improper fastening makes a large difference no matter what kind you use!
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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This is Turtle.
A lot of the Posters here are not versed in the Hurrican winds and what they can do. You being in Texas and also being in the Fla. , Alb., Miss., La., Ga., SC., NC., and Texas so called Hurrican Allie will see all the shingles blown off one side of the roof and not a shingle left to look at. A 200 M.P.H. + wind will skin a roof no matter what you fasten them with. Now a roofing tack on every square inch of the roof might do it.
TURTLE
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That really gets down to how well the "self sealing" tabs work. Fortunately it is always hot enough here so they lay down and the goo is "gooy". They are supposed to put down a strip of cement on the edges of the roof to keep the "rip" from starting there. You are right that the quality ultimately depends on the installer. I did try to be a good homeowner, stay out of their way and keep the cold water coming, so my guys did a pretty good job.
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AMEN! IF everybody was properly insured and recognized that the FEMA grants and SBA loans are funded by taxpayers, the US would be better off.
Have a friend who didn't have earthquake insurance in Calif, on an active fault, because earthquake would have a $20,000 deductible. They neglected to figure the cost of the SBA loan payments after their house slipped off the foundation during the Whittier Narrows quake. She is now the poster child for quake coverage.
--
Totus Tuus
Claudia (take out no spam to reply)
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I thank you for nothing! I pay the same taxes as you do. Why don't _you_ move to another country and then you can whine about something else.
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This is Turtle.
Let me explain to you what the money was for here. It was not to fix homes but to fix utilitys, roads, food for people out of their homes, place to let them stay while they are flooded out, the public officals to get the mess cleaned up after the flood. Washed out roads , food and help to people out of their homes and public building repair does not come cheap these days. Paying for flooded out homes has nothing to do with the 2 Bil. in ade for flood insurance takes care of anybody with flood insurance and nothing to ones with no flood insurance.
Your mixing state ade and flood insurance together and they are totally different programs.
TURTLE
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Turtle, I posted the official FEMA application for assistance which clearly states that it can be used to fix homes. Please read it.

No, YOU are mixing them together. I'm saying if you want to live in high risk areas, pay for enough insurance to cover yourself instead of getting subsidies from the government when you get hit.
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