I have a problem

My house was built 26 years ago. It has an 11x50 concrete patio, set back into the house, with an 11 foot roof overhang. The roof above the patio is supported by three 8x8 (load bearing) wooden posts. The roof above the overhang is concrete tile (like the rest of the house) and thus quite heavy.
The 3 wooden posts rest on 18x18 poured concrete piers and are secured by saddle brackets, set in the concrete.
The problem: They built the piers/brackets that support the wooden posts about 1" too low. When they poured the pad for the concrete patio, they embedded the wooden posts 1" into the patio concrete slab, with the posts and the brackets sticking up through the patio floor.
Therefore, the wooden posts, which are set in the bracket on top of the concrete pier but below the surface of the slab, are starting to develop dry rot because their bottom 1" is embedded in the concrete pad.
What can I do to raise the wooden posts out of the concrete? That's a tough one! Any ideas?
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Walter
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Maybe correctly install new posts in between the current ones, then remove the old posts?
Walter R. wrote:

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Thanks, but I can't do that. The heavy weight of the roof requires piers under the slab where the posts would be.
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Walter
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Actually, you can do that. It just takes more work, but it can be done. There are other solutions though. Use temporary supports while replacing the present supports and get them above grade. Pour an additional couple of inches of concrete or use blocks.
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Are they treated lumber? They will probably last another 20 years even if they show a little rot now.

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Thanks. I would be sleeping much mores soundly if the posts were treated. Unfortunately, they were just plain douglas fir.
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Put temporary support screw jacks on each side,and raise apx 1/2 higher, cut off 6-12" at the bottom, remove wood and fill level with concrete and new metal bracket, cut a new 8x8 piece to fit, from the added on piece screw up into the old beam to get a few countersunk screws in place. Or a cosmetic-joining, collar on the bottom made out of 1x 12
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Good input. Thank you.
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Walter
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Walter R. wrote:

Support the roof with jacks or timbers, sawzall the bottom of the posts 1" or more (whatever you use under the posts will determine this distance, but stay at least one inch above top of patio), then slip a standoff base under the post. The standoff base can be a standard galvanized base, or you could use an 8"x8"x2" concrete pad.
If you don't have enough of the saddle above the finished floor to do this, you may have to weld extensions onto them. You could bolt extensions on if you have the room to do it. The other option would be to cut off the saddle brackets and drill at a forty five degree angle into the bottom of the post, through the post base and into the concrete from opposite sides. Then epoxy a piece of rebar into the concrete and post.
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Thank you, Robert. Your suggestions make good sense. I can probably do this myself for about $50.
I am having a contractor look at the situation. Will be interesting to see what he suggests doing and how much it would cost.
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