How would I get rid of all of the sediments from the plumbing from my house?

How would I get rid of all of the sediments from the plumbing from my house? (yes, I'm on a well)
If I install a filter on the water supply will stop it from coming in 100%? What about the leftover sediments in the system currently? Would shocking the well and system be enough to take care of this issue?
If I do shock the well I intend to install a new hot water tank at the same time and a new water pressure tank. (I'd shock then add the filters and tanks)
When can I wash my whites again? :P
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cln wrote:

Anything _in_ the current system would have to be flushed to remove it.
_NO_ filter is 100%, but you can go to 10 micron, or even 5. Depends on what the sediment is as to how fine it might actually be.
There should, of course, be a sand filter on the foot of the well. Is this a new problem or existing? Jet or submergible pump? Too many other unknowns.
"Shocking" a well will make no difference at all on sediment.
--
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It's an existing problem. I assumed that 100% would be impossible. There is a pump inside the house but wires going into the well so I assume there is _also_ a submergible pump. (Is that even possible?)
How do you 'flush' the system? Just running the water constantly for a day? What is the maintenance on a sand filter?
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cln wrote:

The inside pump is undoubtedly just your pressure pump. If you don't even know what you have, I would suggest you need to find that out first -- it could be a problem at the well foot w/ bad casing, pump set too low, etc., that is the prime cause.
You don't say anything about what the sediment actually is or how much. If it's obvious amounts of sand/mud, there's a real problem; if it's simply longterm things get discolored, that's something else.
Edwind suggests a water sample and test; that's always a good idea just on general principles, but if there is visible sand and/or mud, the problems are more in depth than just mineral deposits...
Depends again on what you have and where it is trapped as to what would take to flush a system, but the general idea is as you suggest. Possibly compressed air as well to blow the lines if significant. Again, too little information of actual situation for anything other than generalities.
Inline filters simply replace cartridges periodically -- foot sand filters are simply fine-mesh screens and need no maintenance in general unless were to clog (in which case your water output goes down) or to develop a hole (in which case it needs replacing). If you're getting observable quantities of sand gritty enough it will settle out in a quart jar, that's indicative of a well problem...
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I find that when I work on the plumbing and have to drain the lines, the air bubbles that are created by the air in the line tend to scour anything loose inside the pipes and instantly clog the aerator, or if I thought to remove it, the water comes out dirty for a second or two.
wrote:

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Depends on the sediment. A whole house filter, or two of them in line (10 micron followed by a 5 or 2 micron) will get most of the sediment. Rust and iron can be very fine and still get through. Since you mention whites, chances are, dissolved solids that a filter will not trap may be the cause of your problem.
One way to find out is to have the water tested by a local reputable water treatment specialist. I'd not call the Culligan man that is mainly interested in selling you his product.
Sediment that is trapped in the piping already will eventually come out, but is probably not a big deal if you trap the new stuff. Ed
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On Mon, 29 Oct 2007, cln wrote:

You need a spin down sediment filter to get rid of larger sediment before any finer filtration.
John
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I went to HD yesterday and got a Household Filtration Unit by GE http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?D 1782&Ntt1782&catalogId051&langId=-15&storeId051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN=0&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNumber I couldn't find the exact model I got but you'll get the idea.
I'm looking if it said 'spin down' but since it was one of only 2 household filters they had, I figured it was my best bet.
They had many other choices but most of them were just under drinking water/under counter installation. The other household filters were (a) the same I had minus the bypass, (b) same I had minus parts like compression fittings and filter, (c) mine, bypass valve compression fittings, filter... finally (d) high flow or high volume filter system which i found odd that the filters that would fit in it only went down to 30 microns (minimum) compared to my model that can take filter with capacity of 5 microns.
Thanks all, I'll start with this and let the system clean itself for a while, then later I'll add onto the system the water softener that I desperately need. I'll make sure I add the right number of ball valves so when I come to add other items to the main line that I won't be stuck draining the whole system for nothing. I'll shock the well later, I know it won't solve the issue of sediments but at least disinfect and maybe clean the pipes.
Thanks again, cln
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