How to wire alarm window/door sensors

Hi, I'm new to this post so I'm hoping you can help me. :? My question is a simple one. I'm prewireing windows/doors for an alarm. I bought 3/8" recessed magnetic contacts that come with 18" leads. The rock is not on yet so I can do the final connections now and tuck them nicely in the stud cavity. I have seen other houses in my ares have the main wire (from control panel) hang by the window and then rockers pull them around drywall. I haven't seen the final product but it seems like some wire would always be visible (unless they install surface mounted contacts, in which case that would make sense). Mine will be recessed (nicely in the window) so if I can hide the wire, I would want to. Here are my questions/concerns: 1. How do I attach the leads to the wire (solder, crimp, wire nuts)? 2. Do I leave wires hanging loose on the other side of the stud or do I staple them (what if I need to access them later, by pulling contact out thru the window/door frame)?
Like I said, simple question, but it has me perplexed.
PS, Do I need to staple low voltage cables (RG6, CAT5, 22/4) to studs like high voltage, or can I leave them loose? Loose would be better if I had to pull/replace damaged wire.
Thanks ya all.
BTW, great forum. Will check this one often...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail-dot-com.no-spam.invalid (mariomp) writes:

There DEFINITELY should NOT be any visible wires except perhaps in the unfinished basement or attic.
We just had an alarm system installed in our 100+ year 3-story house. The installers were very clever at snaking wires all over the house making only minimal holes in the walls. In fact, the electrician who was working in parallel said that he learned quite a few tricks from them.
If they could do it in an old difficult to wire house then you shouldhave no problem in a house with still exposed studs.
The installers first made a Western Union splice, then soldered the wires, then covered with electric tape.
They did not staple any wires that they snaked through the walls. Though in the basement runs they did use small (uninsulated) staples to keep the wires running neatly along the rafters.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Soldering is best and will help prevent false alarms. Use the special "twisted-pair" 2 conductor alarm wire for wiring contacts.
Leave an extra wire loop of one foot or so at the location of each contact. That way, if the contact ever goes bad, you can pull out the wires and replace it.
Very important - Test each and every contact (door - window) before and immediately after the drywall goes up. Even if the contacts are not wired yet, you want to make sure that the wires have not been cut or shorted. Better to find out now then later.
Think about alarm contact zones and what alarm panel you will be using.
Home running every contact to the panel is best for reliability (but also the most expensive and uses the most wire). Many modern alarm boxes can handle a large number of zones 48, 96 etc.
You could put certain contacts in a zone (for example, upstairs windows, basement doors, etc.). Good planning is required, but this will reduce the number of zones and will give you a simpler system. Be aware that if there is a wiring problem with a zone, the whole zone will be dead and unusable.
Most alarm sensors are of the "closed-circuit" type and wired in series, often with end-of-line resistors in series with the most distant contact. Some sensors are of the "open circuit type" - example - under the carpet floor mat sensors and require a special convertor or, in some cases, may be wired directly to the panel as open circuit contacts.
Beachcomber
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.