How to troubleshoot what would make a garbage disposal leak out the bottom?

Page 3 of 4  
On Sun, 21 Jul 2013 10:27:02 -0400, Nate Nagel wrote:

Thanks for the clarification. I had erroneously equated the two terms.
I did buy a pound of the plumbers putty and only used an ounce. I'm not sure *what* to do with the remainder. Maybe let the grandkids play with it as "kid putty"?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 11:36:39 -0700, Oren wrote:

I had strapped it with a strip of tire tube around the garbage disposal unit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Aha. I wondered what he was talking about.

I hadn't thought of that. I used phillips screwdrivers but your idea might be better.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 22:00:24 -0400, micky wrote:

In hindsight, I never needed to touch the snap ring.
What I *should* have done was simply twist the old garbage disposal out (with the hex tool provided), and then twist the new disposal unit in (again, with the hex tool provided).
What I ended up doing was unscrewing the three set bolts, which loosened the mount, but, which doesn't allow the mount to come apart, simply because the snap ring holds the mount together.
The lesson learned is to leave the snap ring alone. Next time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok - The dishwasher is fixed, now what about the clogged drain under the house that was causing the backup, are you still there to look for it???
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 18 Jul 2013 17:31:30 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

When I replaced the garbage disposal on Tuesday, the water leaking from that garbage disposal under the cabinet stopped; but the sink was still backing up with water when the washing machine ran.
So, I returned yesterday with the 50' and 75' snakes:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7430/9318780552_3e8f9b9302_o.gif
I am not sure if I solved anything, but I went into the outside drain about 60 feet (the house is only about 40 feet long) until I could go no longer (even though the snake is 75 feet long).
Two problems I had were: a) The snake kept kinking up (and it's a brand new 75' cable!) b) It stopped dead at 60 feet (which must be halfway under the lawn)
So, I gave up (I had hoped to go the entire 75 feet, which might even make it to the road). I know of no other cleanout but there must be one under the lawn somewhere (right?).
Anyway, I poured water down the washing machine drain with a garden hose for twenty minutes, and, nothing backed up.
So, while I have no idea why the snake just stopped dead at 60 feet (it had stopped twice prior, but I was able to get past whatever stopped it), I "think" whatever was clogged is no longer clogged (this black ooze like black paint came out).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, July 18, 2013 8:30:21 PM UTC-5, Danny D. wrote:

Doesn't sound like you've done this much. Common sewer muck...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 18 Jul 2013 18:52:45 -0700, Bob_Villa wrote:

I haven't done it all that much.
I was surprised I didn't pull out much by way of hair or paper stuff. Pretty much the snake went in about 20 feet, and hung up; then another 30 or so feet, and then hung up; and then another 10 or so feet (total was about 60' measured on the ground with step strides) of my 75 foot snake available.
Pulling out the snake created this black as night puddle, which, surprisingly, didn't stink all that much (certainly not like poop would have) - but it stained everything it touched that was allowed to dry. It was like black paint.
At one point, the snake was stuck solid, and I had to tug and tug and tug just to get it out. It stretched, and then popped out, all of a sudden. I guess I had twisted it into a ball somewhere deep inside.
Anyway, the weird thing is that I never did get all 75 feet inside the drain pipes. I'm surprised because they are at least two inches wide - and the snake is only 3/8".
I don't know how to find the cleanout that might be closer to the street.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 02:42:09 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

What is the pipe made from? My guess is you hung up at the joints or at turns.

Decomposed sewage.

Probably is none. I have a pipe just outside of my house and then nothing as it goes to the street and to the main sewer line, about 100'
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 05:33:01 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The pipe was put in the early sixties, and appears to be cast iron.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 05:33:01 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

OK. Well, that might be the case, as if it's in the yard, it's buried.
I was hoping to get to the main sewer line, but, it hasn't backed up, so, whatever it was, may have been pushed forward by the snake.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A couple friends of mine had this problem. The drain was too small for the washing machine output. I don't remember the numbers, but the PVC pipe was too small. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
When I replaced the garbage disposal on Tuesday, the water leaking from that garbage disposal under the cabinet stopped; but the sink was still backing up with water when the washing machine ran.
So, I returned yesterday with the 50' and 75' snakes:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7430/9318780552_3e8f9b9302_o.gif
I am not sure if I solved anything, but I went into the outside drain about 60 feet (the house is only about 40 feet long) until I could go no longer (even though the snake is 75 feet long).
Two problems I had were: a) The snake kept kinking up (and it's a brand new 75' cable!) b) It stopped dead at 60 feet (which must be halfway under the lawn)
So, I gave up (I had hoped to go the entire 75 feet, which might even make it to the road). I know of no other cleanout but there must be one under the lawn somewhere (right?).
Anyway, I poured water down the washing machine drain with a garden hose for twenty minutes, and, nothing backed up.
So, while I have no idea why the snake just stopped dead at 60 feet (it had stopped twice prior, but I was able to get past whatever stopped it), I "think" whatever was clogged is no longer clogged (this black ooze like black paint came out).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oh, that needs the power drain snake from Harbor Freight. on sale for $249.99 and you need the cutting end atachments for $18.99. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Ok - The dishwasher is fixed, now what about the clogged drain under the house that was causing the backup, are you still there to look for it???
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 07:03:50 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I have all that already (although I have to *find* the cutting attachment since it got separated from the snake itself at one point, because there are multiple attachments and only one stays with the snake.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Jul 2013 03:55:06 +0000, Danny D. wrote:

Lessons learned: - The snap ring was almost impossible to get out and was, by far, the hardest part of the entire job. The next hardest part was putting the new snap ring on without pushing the chrome drain out of the sink. - However, removing the old plastic strain relieve took knowledge of how it worked - but - I didn't have that - so I ended up destroying that plastic strain relief before I finally figured out how it comes apart. - As everyone had said, I "could" have re-used the mounting apparatus, but, my problems with the snap ring negated that as I destroyed the caulking unscrewing the 3 set bolts - The old clamp apparatus had one extra part that the new clamp didn't have - so I added it (a round steel plate under the sink with the cardboard gasket in between it and the underside of the sink). This made putting the new clamp on harder, because it wasn't designed for this additional thick steel plate (I guess). - The new garbage disposal unit was $180 at ACE for 3/4 HP (a 1/2 HP unit was only $100) and it came with a drain pipe elbow & mounting hardware (which had 1 fewer part than the old mounting hardware). - I bought a pound of plumbers putty for the sink (the smallest they had); but only used about an ounce. - I brought wire nuts for the wire replacement and I was glad I did because I had to cut off the old crimped wire nuts in order to remove the old power cord from the old motor. - The new garbage disposal did come *not* come with electrical cord (and a new cord cost $14.50 plus about a buck fifty in tax, which is $16, which is about 20% of the cost of the repair if I used the 1/2 HP motor and about 10% of the cost of the repair with the 3/4 HP motor. - I had screwed on a Romex strain relief, but, I spun it on too tightly (in an attempt to aim the set screws), and it collapsed. Removing the busted strain relief was the third hardest part of the job (after taking off and putting on the snap ring). - Screwing on a second new Romex strain relief, I made no attempt to align the set screws, and it worked just fine with a long-handled thin 1/8" screwdriver. - You need an ohmmeter because the wires on the electrical cord aren't marked as to which one is the neutral and the blades in the male plug are the same size. Either that, or mark the neutral before you cut it off the old unit. - Holding up the garbage disposal wasn't as bad as I thought it would be; but the larger unit pushed against the horizontal drain pipe - causing a slight bit of strain on the pipes. - The new drain elbow was the same size and shape as the old except the old had a round female threaded end which screwed directly onto the old garbage disposal unit while the new elbow fit into an indentation on the new garbage disposal unit with two bolts. This turned out OK - but at first confused me since the ends were so different. But, the long end (unthreaded pipe) fit into the existing drain pipe just like the old one did, albeit with a bit of shoving and pushing. - The larger garbage disposal unit necessitated a longer hose from the dishwasher and aerator Y connector. Since I didn't have a longer hose, I was forced to cheat and put the hose on the nipples only half way. This is my main regret (that I didn't have a longer hose handy). - Next time I'm bringing a set of nut drivers because it was hard to tighten all the hose clamps (there were two of them on that Y connector and one on the garbage disposal unit) with a screwdriver in the enclosed space. - Twisting the disposal unit on with the tool provided turned out to be surprisingly easy; but securing the wire ring was the second hardest part of the entire job. - Without a helper, it's almost impossible to put the wire ring on without accidentally pushing the drain up out of the sink. The helper pushes down from above while you push up from below to secure that dastardly wire ring. - Cleaning up the putty afterward is surprisingly easy. (I'm not sure what to do with the 15 ounces I still have, but, I guess it can come in handy somehow around the house). - The wood is destroyed on the floor of the cabinet from how long the water must have been leaking on it; so I need to figure out what to put there on top to prevent the floor of the cabinet from collapsing (it's about 2 inches above the kitchen floor and it's just particle board. Yuck. Crappy stuff if you ask me; but I'm not sure how to fix it now that it's already ruined. - It probably didn't help that I was on my back, butt on the tile floor but my shoulders squished inside the cabinet, making the entire wet particle board floor of the cabinet sag from my weight. - I was glad I wore overalls (all this bending down lifts the back of my shirt otherwise) and I was very glad I had kneepads; but, I really need to go on a diet (I swore many times about that cabinet opening having a post right in the middle where the two doors open up under the sink).
Overall, except for removing and replacing that snap ring, and the mistake with the Romex strain relief, it was a relatively easy job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, July 18, 2013 9:33:05 PM UTC-5, Danny D. wrote: <snip> Do disrespect Danny...but are you a Danielle?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, July 19, 2013 4:59:36 AM UTC-5, Bob_Villa wrote:

Sorry (if necessary) I did find a reference to a wife!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 02:33:05 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Never attempt to measure the ohms before you've measured the vottage between the same 2 point. It's easy to imagine there is no voltage when there's enough to burn out part of your ohmeter (usually a precision resistor).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 12:50:17 -0400, micky wrote:

I only measured *after8 the wire was cut off the old garbage disposal unit, so, there was no electricity (other than the battery in the ohmmeter).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 07:49:50 -0700, Oren wrote:

Wow. I never knew. Luckily I brought the DMM, but, this is nice to know!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.