How to remove hot water baseboard heater

First, I'm brand new to this forum, and thrilled to find you all here.
Second, I'm an avid DIYer, and have done lots of heavy-duty work myself.
Third, I just bought a condo in a building built in 1915 as apartments. Much of the improvements made on the units here were done on the cheap... Including the hot water baseboard heat installation: All the plumbing was installed *outside* the walls. The only good news about this is that most of my plumbing is *very* accessible.
Fourth, and here's my situation, I just tore down a wall which separated the original tiny, very un-functional kitchen from the "butler's pantry" where the beautiful old cabinetry is. Wonderful, except what I have now is two hot water baseboard heaters running through the middle of the room. My beloved plumber has a plan for redirecting the heating which will also work with the new appliances and cabinets I'm going to install. However, he won't be available for several weeks (NONE of the plumbers in my area have any time,) and I need to get my flooring in and get my walls prepared for the appliances, cabinets and countertops that will be arriving in the next couple weeks.
So I want to remove the baseboard heaters myself and to cap off the pipes at the edges of the room so I can do the work I need to do ASAP... If that's possible. I've already stripped them down to just pipe and fins.
My level of experience with plumbing: I've removed and installed toilets and sinks & faucets using copper, pvc and almost every other type of pipe.
So can I do this? If so, HOW? I've scoured the internet and haven't found a how-to on this.
THANK YOU for what ever help you might be able to give me!!!
--Bonnie.
--
bprose


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Your baseboard must originate and terminate at a boiler (feed and return). If you only have one zone in the condo you should be able to drain it down at the boiler then just cut the pipes near the walls as you don't need heat now. Some plumbers install valves on the heating zones that you can close off, but some don't. If your boiler is supplying hot water (domestic) you need to keep that active.

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bprose wrote:

<SNIP>

WHOA!!
This is a Hydronic heating system. The water in those baseboard units is under pressure. If the building has one central boiler, it could be a *lot* of pressure.
There is no way that you can simply cut out a section without lots of experience and preparation.
Second, as a condo unit owner, you don't have the legal right to tamper with systems which may be part of the common property.
I don't mean to sound scolding, but you may be in way over your head...
Jim
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Greetings,
What you want to do is easy.
a) cut off the water to hydronic heating system (make sure regular hot water still works) b) drain the water c) cut the pipes
Hope this helps, William
PS: There is an air-release valve on the corner of the baseboard itself you can unscrew to drain the water if it makes life easier for you. If someone gives you a hard time about violating their legal rights just own up to it.
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can you do this?,,, you'll need to have a mop and bucket, a wet shopvac with a toilet or floor drain, all of your tools, and,,, a plumber. have you had a plumber chesk the system to see if it works or leaks before you tear it apart? you'll need to determine many answers before starting... is your hot water heat boiler separate from your hot drinking water? if no then stop now because we don't want to destroy your hope for completing this project. are you prepared to shut off your water main if the cold water shutoff refilling your boiler leaks? have you pretested that main to see if it stops all water flow 100%? did you read up on refilling the system and its air tank properly? are the water pressure gauges on the boiler and its temperature gauge both working? your building codes probably don't want water pipes in the exterior wall cavities where they can freeze. is your scheme of replacement heating btu's sufficient? will your plans include adding insulation to all walls and ceilings and floors? is this a monoflow system where there is actually a loop from which T fittings divert part of the water up to a radiator then T back to the loop? is this job an opportunity to add individual mechanical thermostat controls at each radiator for mini-zone control?
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First go to your local plumbers union hall or whatever they call it your area. They should vey happy to give you any "how to's" you need. And too there you'll find many a hungry plumber who wants outside work as well. You can work as his helper. That's what I did for that house on the south shore of Boston. (Note the reply to the guy in NJ with the 150 yr old.) It ended as a 3 zone: steam finned upstairs/ci downstairs.
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I too live in the Boston area (west of city). Plumbers are backed up and very high priced.
Were you happy with your moonlighting guy? - Was he properly licensed and willing to get permits? (or was he afraid of the union :) - Was his work high quality and neat? - What did he charge? - If above all check out, are you willing to give me his name and number? :)
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