How to mount door handles?

I am trying to figure out how I can mount a pair of door pulls onto an alumninum framed glass door.
The door pull may look like this:
http://www.crlaurence.com/ProductPages/C/CS10X10BS_32435-high.html?Origin I think there is a screw that fastens the pull from the back side. So what I can do is to drill a hole all the way through front and back, with the back hole larger in size (to pass the entire screw through) and the front hole smaller.
However, I would like to mount two handles - one on each side at the same location.
How will I be able to mount both handles at the same time (unless it's mounted from the front with a set screw but I don't think this is the case)?
I see this done with glass door all the time with handles on both sides, how does the mounting work? I can see some sort of a threaded rod that goes from one end to the other, but there is no way to tighten it since the handle has two mounting hole (one on top one at bottom) so you can't turn each handle to tighten...
MC
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On Wed, 20 Jun 2007 04:23:26 -0400, "MiamiCuse"

There has to be wide spot to the screw, the same width as the handle to be unobtrusive, with holes for a pin wrench, a spanner wrench with a pin at one end, to tighten things with.
Go find some doors like this at the mall and you'll see that there is one extra piece, like a washer, on each leg of the handle, just before the glass.
When you actually buy these handles, it will be easy. Making them yourself probably won't be easy, because one handle has to have left-handed threads, and the screw has to be right handed at one end and left handed at the other.
The screw you can maybe find, in a turnbuckle or something, but I don't think you'll find a handle that takes a left-handed screw. Maybe you could retap a right-handed handle, and mayyyybe that would be strong enough, but where would you get a left handed tap?
Maybe you could jamb the left handed screw in while you turned it left?? Then you would have to open the side of the wooden? door and tighten both handles at the same time with vice grips or something. A lot of work. Maybe you can find what you want for sale.

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There's a bolt-stud. The threaded end goes is inserted through the hole in the door from the interior and into the exterior handle. That's tightened up nice and snug. The interior end of the bold-stud has a "knob" at the end with a tapered section inboard. The interior handle has set screws that engage the taper. The tighter you crank the set screws the tighter the interior handle pulls into the door as it rides down the taper.
R
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RicodJour I think I get the picture, so the exterior end is threaded and screwed on to this "bolt-stud" no problem. The other side is mounted on and tightened with a set screw, the set screw bites on to the knob shaped end and tightens up further.
So I had the wrong idea, I thought may be it's just a "rod" and set screws on both sides.
What this means is that these handles requires this special bolt that is designed for a specific door thickness. I cannot just buy two handles and expect them to work without knowing what the bolt they come with is designed for what door thickness...unless this bolt is a generic item that may be found at any hardware store.
MC
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On Jun 21, 1:43 pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

It's not a typical item. The handle set must be designed that way and the stud-bolt is most certainly not standard to anyone but the OEM.
R
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wrote:

Got it! Thanks!
MC
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